Subcutaneous ureteral bypass for treatment of bilateral ureteral obstruction in a cat with retroperitoneal paraganglioma

Corie Borchert Department of Interventional Endoscopy and Radiology, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Allyson Berent Department of Interventional Endoscopy and Radiology, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Chick Weisse Department of Interventional Endoscopy and Radiology, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of azotemia and unilateral hydronephrosis.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Abdominal ultrasonography revealed right-sided hydronephrosis and dilation of the proximal aspect of the ureter; the left kidney was small with irregular margins. A highly vascular, irregular retroperitoneal mass, not clearly associated with the ureteral obstruction, was also visualized. Surgical exploration confirmed a retroperitoneal mass involving the caudal mesenteric artery and both ureters, with hydroureter on the right side.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device was surgically implanted to treat right ureteral obstruction, and the mass was biopsied. Shortly after surgery, progressive azotemia and hyperkalemia were detected; ultrasonographic examination revealed left-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter, which was suspected secondary to inflammation of the mass causing a left-sided ureteral obstruction. A second surgery was performed to place an SUB device for the left kidney and remove the retroperitoneal mass; both ureters were ligated at the mid- and distal aspects and then transected and removed with the mass. A neuroendocrine paraganglioma was identified by histopathologic evaluation of the mass. Hydronephrosis improved (right kidney) or resolved (left kidney) after surgery, and azotemia improved. Chemotherapeutic intervention was declined. Markers of renal function were static during the 14-month follow-up period. At the last follow-up evaluation, the patient was reportedly doing well, and both SUB devices were patent.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE This was the first report of retroperitoneal paraganglioma in a domestic cat causing bilateral ureteral obstruction. Bilateral SUB device placement enabled en bloc mass resection and provided long-term relief of ureteral obstruction.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of azotemia and unilateral hydronephrosis.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Abdominal ultrasonography revealed right-sided hydronephrosis and dilation of the proximal aspect of the ureter; the left kidney was small with irregular margins. A highly vascular, irregular retroperitoneal mass, not clearly associated with the ureteral obstruction, was also visualized. Surgical exploration confirmed a retroperitoneal mass involving the caudal mesenteric artery and both ureters, with hydroureter on the right side.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device was surgically implanted to treat right ureteral obstruction, and the mass was biopsied. Shortly after surgery, progressive azotemia and hyperkalemia were detected; ultrasonographic examination revealed left-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter, which was suspected secondary to inflammation of the mass causing a left-sided ureteral obstruction. A second surgery was performed to place an SUB device for the left kidney and remove the retroperitoneal mass; both ureters were ligated at the mid- and distal aspects and then transected and removed with the mass. A neuroendocrine paraganglioma was identified by histopathologic evaluation of the mass. Hydronephrosis improved (right kidney) or resolved (left kidney) after surgery, and azotemia improved. Chemotherapeutic intervention was declined. Markers of renal function were static during the 14-month follow-up period. At the last follow-up evaluation, the patient was reportedly doing well, and both SUB devices were patent.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE This was the first report of retroperitoneal paraganglioma in a domestic cat causing bilateral ureteral obstruction. Bilateral SUB device placement enabled en bloc mass resection and provided long-term relief of ureteral obstruction.

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