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Letters to the Editor

Advising clients on use of cannabis

Given the more than 2 decades since medical use of cannabis in humans was first legalized, it is not surprising that researchers, veterinarians, and pet owners alike are asking whether cannabis is safe or effective in animals.1 Currently, 30 states have legalized marijuana use in people, including 10 states that have legalized both medical and recreational use, and another 13 states have passed laws allowing some limited medical uses of marijuana. The US FDA has approved 3 cannabinoid-based drugs, including, most recently, Epidiolex, which contains cannabidiol and has been approved for use