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Professional development groups help physicians; why not veterinarians?

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  • 1 Outpatient Psychiatry Department, Cambridge Health Alliance, 26 Central St, 3rd Floor, Somerville, MA 02143.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Depression, compassion fatigue, burnout, and a high rate of suicide have become primary concerns in the veterinary profession. Although there have been differing viewpoints on the prevalence of these conditions,1 there is no dispute that veterinarians are often exposed to potentially destabilizing stressors that take an emotional toll. Medical students, residents, and physicians in clinical practice experience similar stressors,2 and in response, the medical profession has published a vast literature on the problem and developed some effective programs for students and doctors.3–5 Given the similarities between the veterinary and human medical professions, it seems

Depression, compassion fatigue, burnout, and a high rate of suicide have become primary concerns in the veterinary profession. Although there have been differing viewpoints on the prevalence of these conditions,1 there is no dispute that veterinarians are often exposed to potentially destabilizing stressors that take an emotional toll. Medical students, residents, and physicians in clinical practice experience similar stressors,2 and in response, the medical profession has published a vast literature on the problem and developed some effective programs for students and doctors.3–5 Given the similarities between the veterinary and human medical professions, it seems

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Blum (nancy_blum@hms.harvard.edu).