• 1. Beaufrère H, Rodriguez D, Pariaut R, et al. Estimation of intrathoracic arterial diameter by means of computed tomographic angiography in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Am J Vet Res 2011;72:210218.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Hayati F, Saeed M, Khafi A, et al. Surgical removal of a tube-like foreign body from an Alexandrine parakeet (Psittacula eupatria) using a ventricular approach: a case report. Glob Vet 2012;9:696699.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Wells S. Alimentary foreign body in an Amazon parrot. Mod Vet Pract 1984;65:385386.

  • 4. Wallace RS. Sphenisciformes (penguins). In: Miller R, Fowler M, eds. Fowler's zoo and wild animal medicine. Vol 8. 8th ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2015;8288.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Perpiñán D, Curro TG, Perpin D. Gastrointestinal obstruction in penguin chicks. J Avian Med Surg 2009;23:290293.

  • 6. Padilla LR. Gaviiformes, podicipediformes, and procellariformes (loons, grebes, petrels, and albatrosses). In: Miller R, Fowler M, eds. Fowler's zoo and wild animal medicine. Vol 8. 8th ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2015;8995.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Speer BL. Chronic partial proventricular obstruction caused by multiple gastrointestinal foreign bodies in a juvenile umbrella cockatoo (Cacatua alba). J Avian Med Surg 1998;12:271275.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Lumeij JT. Gastro-enterology. In: Richie B, Harrison G, Harrison L, eds. Avian medicine: principles and applications. Lake Worth, Fla: Wingers Publishing, 1996;482521.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Van Vloten JGG. Traumatische gastritis bij duiven. Tijdschr Diergeneeskd 1964;89:687694.

  • 10. Saritas Z, Pamuk K, Korkmaz M, et al. A case of ventricular foreign body in a goose. J Anim Vet Adv 2011;10:991992.

  • 11. Lois A, Mattielo R. Cuerpo extraño en paloma. Rev Electron Vet 2009;10:12.

  • 12. Salinsky J, Aguilar RF. What is your diagnosis? J Avian Med Surg 2010;24:7780.

  • 13. Hoefer H, Levitan D. Perforating foreign body in the ventriculus of an umbrella cockatoo (Cacatua alba). J Avian Med Surg 2013;27:128135.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Champour M, Ojrati N. Ventriculotomy for the removal of a foreign body in a common myna (Acridotheres tristis): a case report. Vet Med (Praha) 2014;2014:319323.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15. Castaño-Jiménez PA, Trent AM, Bueno I. Surgical removal of a ventricular foreign body in a captive African black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus). J Avian Med Surg 2016;30:4652.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Denbow DM. Gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. In: Whittow GC, ed. Sturkie's avian physiology. 5th ed. San Diego: Academic Press, 2000;299325.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Beaufrère H, Nevarez J, Taylor WM, et al. Fluoroscopic study of the normal gastrointestinal motility and measurements in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis). Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2010;51:441446.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Lloyd C. Staged endoscopic ventricular foreign body removal in a gyr falcon (Falco rusticolus). J Avian Med Surg 2009;23:314319.

  • 19. Forbes N. Avian gastrointestinal surgery. Semin Avian Exot Pet Med 2002;11:196207.

  • 20. Ferrell S, Werner J, Kyles A, et al. Evaluation of a collagen patch as a method of enhancing ventriculotomy healing in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). Vet Surg 2003;32:103112.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21. Simova-Curd S, Foldenauer U, Guerrero T, et al. Comparison of ventriculotomy closure with and without a coelomic fat patch in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). J Avian Med Surg 2013;27:713.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22. Kinsel MJ, Briggs MB, Crang RF, et al. Ventricular phytobezoard impatcion in three Micronesian kingfishers (Halcyon cinnamomina cinnamomina). J Zoo Wildl Med 2004;35:525529.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23. Langlois I. The anatomy, physiology, and diseases of the avian proventriculus and ventriculus. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract 2003;6:85111.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Perforating foreign body in the ventriculus of a pet pigeon (Columba livia domestica)

Delphine Laniesse DVM, DVSc1, Hugues Beaufrère DVM, PhD2, Shawn Mackenzie DVM, DVSc3, Ameet Singh DVM, DVSc4, Ayman Samman DVM, PhD5, and Leonardo Susta DVM, PhD6
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 5 Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 6 Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old female pigeon was evaluated because of a 5-day history of lower than typical activity level, weight loss, and polyuria.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Whole-body radiography revealed a linear metallic foreign body in the area of the ventriculus. Fluoroscopy followed by contrast-enhanced CT was performed to further characterize the lesion location, revealing that the foreign body had perforated the ventral aspect of the ventriculus wall and that the ventral extremity of the foreign body was surrounded by a mass, consistent with a granuloma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A midline celiotomy was performed, and a large granuloma was identified ventral to the ventriculus, adherent to the dorsal aspect of the keel bone. The metallic foreign body (a nail) was removed, and the content of the granuloma was debrided. Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (150 mg/kg [68.2 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 10 days), meloxicam (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 5 days), and sucralfate (100 mg/kg [45 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h for 10 days) were prescribed. The pigeon made a successful recovery and was still doing well at a 1-year recheck evaluation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although traumatic gastritis in pigeons has been reported, use of advanced diagnostic imaging for the pigeon of this report facilitated identification of the precise nature of the lesion and, therefore, surgical planning. The outcome for this pigeon suggested that successful resolution of traumatic gastritis may be possible in other affected birds with surgery.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old female pigeon was evaluated because of a 5-day history of lower than typical activity level, weight loss, and polyuria.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Whole-body radiography revealed a linear metallic foreign body in the area of the ventriculus. Fluoroscopy followed by contrast-enhanced CT was performed to further characterize the lesion location, revealing that the foreign body had perforated the ventral aspect of the ventriculus wall and that the ventral extremity of the foreign body was surrounded by a mass, consistent with a granuloma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A midline celiotomy was performed, and a large granuloma was identified ventral to the ventriculus, adherent to the dorsal aspect of the keel bone. The metallic foreign body (a nail) was removed, and the content of the granuloma was debrided. Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (150 mg/kg [68.2 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 10 days), meloxicam (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 5 days), and sucralfate (100 mg/kg [45 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h for 10 days) were prescribed. The pigeon made a successful recovery and was still doing well at a 1-year recheck evaluation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although traumatic gastritis in pigeons has been reported, use of advanced diagnostic imaging for the pigeon of this report facilitated identification of the precise nature of the lesion and, therefore, surgical planning. The outcome for this pigeon suggested that successful resolution of traumatic gastritis may be possible in other affected birds with surgery.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Laniesse (delphine.laniesse@gmail.com).

Dr. Laniesse's present address is Eläinsairaala Evidensia Tammisto, Tammiston kauppatie 29, 01510 Vantaa, Finland.

Dr. Mackenzie's present address is Toronto Veterinary Emergency Hospital, 21 Rolark Dr, Toronto, ON M1R 3B1, Canada.

Dr. Samman's present address is the Department of Applied Medical Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia.