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Face, construct, and concurrent validity of a simulation model for laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses

Mustafa M. ElarbiDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Claude A. RagleDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Boel A. FranssonDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Kelly D. FarnsworthDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a simulation model for laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

DESIGN Prospective cohort study.

SAMPLE 15 third-year veterinary students and 4 equine surgeons with experience in laparoscopy.

PROCEDURES A simulation model that mimicked laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses was developed. Face validity of the model was determined with a questionnaire completed by the equine surgeons. Construct validity was determined by comparing performance scores (based on time to completion and accuracy completing various operative tasks) for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model for the students with scores for the equine surgeons. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing performance scores with scores obtained with the validated McGill Inanimate System for Training and Evaluation of Laparoscopic Skills (MISTELS).

RESULTS Questionnaire responses indicated that the simulation model replicated the operative experience to a high degree (face validity). Performance scores for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model were significantly different between the students and the equine surgeons (construct validity). Performance scores for the simulation model were significantly correlated with scores for the MISTELS (concurrent validity).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the simulation model had face, construct, and concurrent validity, suggesting that it may be useful when training students to perform laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a simulation model for laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

DESIGN Prospective cohort study.

SAMPLE 15 third-year veterinary students and 4 equine surgeons with experience in laparoscopy.

PROCEDURES A simulation model that mimicked laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses was developed. Face validity of the model was determined with a questionnaire completed by the equine surgeons. Construct validity was determined by comparing performance scores (based on time to completion and accuracy completing various operative tasks) for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model for the students with scores for the equine surgeons. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing performance scores with scores obtained with the validated McGill Inanimate System for Training and Evaluation of Laparoscopic Skills (MISTELS).

RESULTS Questionnaire responses indicated that the simulation model replicated the operative experience to a high degree (face validity). Performance scores for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model were significantly different between the students and the equine surgeons (construct validity). Performance scores for the simulation model were significantly correlated with scores for the MISTELS (concurrent validity).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the simulation model had face, construct, and concurrent validity, suggesting that it may be useful when training students to perform laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Ragle (ragle@wsu.edu).