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Consequences of fipronil exposure in egg-laying hens

Emma G. Stafford PharmD1, Lisa A. Tell DVM2, Zhoumeng Lin BMed, PhD3, Jennifer L. Davis DVM, PhD4, Thomas W. Vickroy PhD5, Jim E. Riviere DVM, PhD6, and Ronald E. Baynes DVM, PhD7
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  • 1 Food Animal Residue Avoidance and Depletion Program (FARAD), Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.
  • | 2 FARAD, Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 FARAD, Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 4 FARAD, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060.
  • | 5 FARAD, Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.
  • | 6 FARAD, Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 7 Food Animal Residue Avoidance and Depletion Program (FARAD), Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Stafford (egstaffo@ncsu.edu).