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Survival analysis to evaluate associations between periodontal disease and the risk of development of chronic azotemic kidney disease in cats evaluated at primary care veterinary hospitals

Rosalie T. Trevejo DVM, MPVM, PhD1, Sandra L. Lefebvre DVM, PhD2, Mingyin Yang BVMS, MS3, Catherine Rhoads BA4, Gary Goldstein DVM5, and Elizabeth M. Lund DVM, MPH, PhD6
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  • 1 Banfield Pet Hospital, 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683.
  • | 2 Banfield Pet Hospital, 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683.
  • | 3 Banfield Pet Hospital, 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683.
  • | 4 Banfield Pet Hospital, 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 6 Banfield Pet Hospital, 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To examine potential associations between periodontal disease (PD) and the risk of development of chronic azotemic kidney disease (CKD) among cats and determine whether the risk of CKD increases with severity of PD.

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS 169, 242 cats.

PROCEDURES Cats were evaluated ≥ 3 times at any of 829 hospitals from January 1, 2002, through June 30, 2013. Cats with an initial diagnosis of PD of any stage (n = 56,414) were frequency matched with cats that had no history or evidence of PD (112,828) by age and year of study entry. Data on signalment, PD, and other conditions potentially related to CKD were extracted from electronic medical records. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate the association of PD with CKD after controlling for covariates.

RESULTS PD was associated with increased risk of CKD; risk was highest for cats with stage 3 or 4 PD. Risk of CKD increased with age. Purebred cats had greater risk of CKD than mixed-breed cats. General anesthesia within the year before study exit and diagnosis of cystitis at any point prior to study exit (including prior to study entry) were each associated with increased CKD risk. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or hepatic lipidosis at any point prior to study exit was associated with decreased CKD risk.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The findings supported the benefit of maintaining good oral health and can be useful to veterinarians for educating owners on the importance of preventing PD in cats.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To examine potential associations between periodontal disease (PD) and the risk of development of chronic azotemic kidney disease (CKD) among cats and determine whether the risk of CKD increases with severity of PD.

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS 169, 242 cats.

PROCEDURES Cats were evaluated ≥ 3 times at any of 829 hospitals from January 1, 2002, through June 30, 2013. Cats with an initial diagnosis of PD of any stage (n = 56,414) were frequency matched with cats that had no history or evidence of PD (112,828) by age and year of study entry. Data on signalment, PD, and other conditions potentially related to CKD were extracted from electronic medical records. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate the association of PD with CKD after controlling for covariates.

RESULTS PD was associated with increased risk of CKD; risk was highest for cats with stage 3 or 4 PD. Risk of CKD increased with age. Purebred cats had greater risk of CKD than mixed-breed cats. General anesthesia within the year before study exit and diagnosis of cystitis at any point prior to study exit (including prior to study entry) were each associated with increased CKD risk. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or hepatic lipidosis at any point prior to study exit was associated with decreased CKD risk.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The findings supported the benefit of maintaining good oral health and can be useful to veterinarians for educating owners on the importance of preventing PD in cats.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Lefebvre's present address is AVMA, 1931 N Meacham Rd, Ste 100, Schaumburg, IL 60173.

Ms. Rhoad's present address is Kaiser Permanente, 10180 SE Sunnyside Rd, Clackamas, OR 97015.

Dr. Goldstein's present address is Lakefield Veterinary Group, 19717 62nd Ave S, Ste F103, Kent, WA 98032.

Dr. Lund's present address is DataDogs, 55 Eagle Crest Dr, Lake Oswego, OR 97035.

Address correspondence to Dr. Trevejo (trevejor@onid.orst.edu).