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Use of endoscopic-guided electrocautery ablation for treatment of tracheal liposarcoma in a dog

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  • 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Clinique Vétérinaire Alliance, 8 boulevard Godard, 33300 Bordeaux, France.
  • | 2 Department of Medical Imaging, Clinique Vétérinaire Alliance, 8 boulevard Godard, 33300 Bordeaux, France.
  • | 3 Department of Surgery, Clinique Vétérinaire Alliance, 8 boulevard Godard, 33300 Bordeaux, France.
  • | 4 Department of Internal Medicine, Clinique Vétérinaire Alliance, 8 boulevard Godard, 33300 Bordeaux, France.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old 44-kg (97-lb) neutered male Great Pyrenees was referred for evaluation because of episodic dyspnea with cyanosis of 1 to 2 weeks' duration. Three days prior to evaluation, the clinical signs had worsened, including 1 episode of collapse.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Thoracic radiography and CT revealed a well-delineated soft tissue mass, located approximately 1.5 cm cranial to the carina and occupying almost 90% of the tracheal lumen. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis were performed, and all results were within reference limits.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Tracheoscopy confirmed the presence of a broad-based bilobate mass that was protruding from the right dorsal aspect of the trachea and occupied almost the entire tracheal lumen. The mass was successfully resected by endoscopic-guided electrocautery ablation. Findings of histologic evaluation were consistent with a diagnosis of liposarcoma. Immediately following the ablation procedure, the previously noted clinical signs of respiratory tract disease resolved. On follow-up examination 12 months later, no regrowth of the mass was evident on thoracic helical CT and tracheoscopy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Endoscopic-guided electrocautery ablation of tracheal liposarcoma was a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for the dog of this report. The procedure was brief and appeared to be well tolerated, resulting in immediate improvement of clinical signs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old 44-kg (97-lb) neutered male Great Pyrenees was referred for evaluation because of episodic dyspnea with cyanosis of 1 to 2 weeks' duration. Three days prior to evaluation, the clinical signs had worsened, including 1 episode of collapse.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Thoracic radiography and CT revealed a well-delineated soft tissue mass, located approximately 1.5 cm cranial to the carina and occupying almost 90% of the tracheal lumen. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis were performed, and all results were within reference limits.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Tracheoscopy confirmed the presence of a broad-based bilobate mass that was protruding from the right dorsal aspect of the trachea and occupied almost the entire tracheal lumen. The mass was successfully resected by endoscopic-guided electrocautery ablation. Findings of histologic evaluation were consistent with a diagnosis of liposarcoma. Immediately following the ablation procedure, the previously noted clinical signs of respiratory tract disease resolved. On follow-up examination 12 months later, no regrowth of the mass was evident on thoracic helical CT and tracheoscopy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Endoscopic-guided electrocautery ablation of tracheal liposarcoma was a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for the dog of this report. The procedure was brief and appeared to be well tolerated, resulting in immediate improvement of clinical signs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Bua's present address is Département des sciences cliniques, Faculté de médecine vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, St-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada.

Address correspondence to Dr. Bua (bua.annesophie@gmail.com).