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Analysis of platinum content in biodegradable carboplatin-impregnated beads and retrospective assessment of tolerability for intralesional use of the beads in dogs following excision of subcutaneous sarcomas: 29 cases (2011–2014)

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  • 1 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 2 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 3 Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carleton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263.
  • | 4 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 5 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 6 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 7 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.
  • | 8 Oradell Animal Hospital, 580 Winters Ave, Paramus, NJ 07652.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate platinum content in biodegradable carboplatin-impregnated beads and retrospectively assess tolerability and outcome data for dogs treated by intralesional placement of such beads following surgical excision of subcutaneous sarcomas.

DESIGN Evaluation study and retrospective case series.

SAMPLE 9 carboplatin-impregnated beads and 29 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Platinum content in 9 carboplatin-impregnated beads from 3 lots was measured by spectrophotometry, and calculated carboplatin content was compared with the labeled content. Medical records were searched to identify dogs with subcutaneous sarcomas for which treatment included placement of carboplatin-impregnated beads between 2011 and 2014. Signalment, tumor characteristics, surgical and histologic data, adverse events, and local recurrences were recorded. Associations between variables of interest and adverse events or local disease-free interval were analyzed.

RESULTS In vitro analysis identified a mean ± SD platinum content of 5.38 ± 0.97 mg/bead. Calculated carboplatin content (10.24 ± 1.84 mg/bead) was significantly greater than the labeled amount (4.6 mg/bead). Bead weight and total platinum content differed significantly among lots, but platinum content per bead weight did not. Mild-to-moderate local adverse events were reported for 11 of 29 tumors; all resolved without additional surgery. No dogs had signs of systemic toxicosis. Overall local disease-free rates 1, 2, and 3 years after surgery were 70%, 70%, and 58%, respectively, as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Carboplatin-impregnated beads were well tolerated; however, results of in vitro tests indicated that caution is needed because of manufacturing inconsistencies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate platinum content in biodegradable carboplatin-impregnated beads and retrospectively assess tolerability and outcome data for dogs treated by intralesional placement of such beads following surgical excision of subcutaneous sarcomas.

DESIGN Evaluation study and retrospective case series.

SAMPLE 9 carboplatin-impregnated beads and 29 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Platinum content in 9 carboplatin-impregnated beads from 3 lots was measured by spectrophotometry, and calculated carboplatin content was compared with the labeled content. Medical records were searched to identify dogs with subcutaneous sarcomas for which treatment included placement of carboplatin-impregnated beads between 2011 and 2014. Signalment, tumor characteristics, surgical and histologic data, adverse events, and local recurrences were recorded. Associations between variables of interest and adverse events or local disease-free interval were analyzed.

RESULTS In vitro analysis identified a mean ± SD platinum content of 5.38 ± 0.97 mg/bead. Calculated carboplatin content (10.24 ± 1.84 mg/bead) was significantly greater than the labeled amount (4.6 mg/bead). Bead weight and total platinum content differed significantly among lots, but platinum content per bead weight did not. Mild-to-moderate local adverse events were reported for 11 of 29 tumors; all resolved without additional surgery. No dogs had signs of systemic toxicosis. Overall local disease-free rates 1, 2, and 3 years after surgery were 70%, 70%, and 58%, respectively, as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Carboplatin-impregnated beads were well tolerated; however, results of in vitro tests indicated that caution is needed because of manufacturing inconsistencies.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Hess' present address is Affiliated Veterinary Specialists, 7314 W University Ave, Gainesville, FL 32607.

Dr. Drinkhouse's present address is the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Address correspondence to Dr. Bailey (dbailey@oradell.com).