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Intestinal lymphoma in dogs: 84 cases (1997–2012)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Red Bank Veterinary Hospital, 197 Hance Ave, Tinton Falls, NJ 07724.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe signalment, clinicopathologic features, and outcomes of dogs with confirmed primary intestinal lymphoma and assess factors associated with survival times in these patients.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 84 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records from 7 veterinary institutions were retrospectively reviewed to identify dogs with primary intestinal lymphoma. Data collected included signalment, clinical signs, anatomic location of tumors, diagnostic procedures, treatment, outcome, and dates of diagnosis and death.

RESULTS Overall median survival time (MST) was 62 days (range, 1 to 537 days). Factors associated with shorter survival time on univariate analysis included anorexia or septic peritonitis at the time of diagnosis and tumor location (intestinal tract only, intestinal tract and abdominal lymph nodes, or intestinal tract and extraintestinal organs). The most commonly noted changes in the intestinal tract were altered wall thickening with loss of layering (41 dogs) and presence of ≥ 1 discrete mass (24 dogs). Protocols based on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone with or without l-asparaginase (48 dogs) or 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (14 dogs) were most commonly used as first-line treatment; the MSTs of dogs receiving these treatments (60 and 144 days, respectively) did not differ significantly.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The MST of dogs with primary intestinal lymphoma was poor, regardless of first-line treatment used. Anorexia and septic peritonitis were associated with poor prognosis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe signalment, clinicopathologic features, and outcomes of dogs with confirmed primary intestinal lymphoma and assess factors associated with survival times in these patients.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 84 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records from 7 veterinary institutions were retrospectively reviewed to identify dogs with primary intestinal lymphoma. Data collected included signalment, clinical signs, anatomic location of tumors, diagnostic procedures, treatment, outcome, and dates of diagnosis and death.

RESULTS Overall median survival time (MST) was 62 days (range, 1 to 537 days). Factors associated with shorter survival time on univariate analysis included anorexia or septic peritonitis at the time of diagnosis and tumor location (intestinal tract only, intestinal tract and abdominal lymph nodes, or intestinal tract and extraintestinal organs). The most commonly noted changes in the intestinal tract were altered wall thickening with loss of layering (41 dogs) and presence of ≥ 1 discrete mass (24 dogs). Protocols based on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone with or without l-asparaginase (48 dogs) or 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (14 dogs) were most commonly used as first-line treatment; the MSTs of dogs receiving these treatments (60 and 144 days, respectively) did not differ significantly.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The MST of dogs with primary intestinal lymphoma was poor, regardless of first-line treatment used. Anorexia and septic peritonitis were associated with poor prognosis.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Sogame's present address is SAGE Centers for Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Care, 934 Charter St, Redwood City, CA 94063.

Dr. Risbon's present address is Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 301 Veterans Hwy, Levittown, PA 19056.

Address correspondence to Dr. Burgess (kristine.burgess@tufts.edu).