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Multicenter evaluation of signalment and comorbid conditions associated with aortic thrombotic disease in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36832.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess signalment and concurrent disease processes in dogs with aortic thrombotic disease (ATD).

DESIGN Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS Dogs examined at North American veterinary teaching hospitals from 1985 through 2011 with medical records submitted to the Veterinary Medical Database.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with a diagnosis of ATD (case dogs). Five control dogs without a diagnosis of ATD were then identified for every case dog. Data were collected regarding dog age, sex, breed, body weight, and concurrent disease processes.

RESULTS ATD was diagnosed in 291 of the 984,973 (0.03%) dogs included in the database. The odds of a dog having ATD did not differ significantly by sex, age, or body weight. Compared with mixed-breed dogs, Shetland Sheepdogs had a significantly higher odds of ATD (OR, 2.59). Protein-losing nephropathy (64/291 [22%]) was the most commonly recorded concurrent disease in dogs with ATD.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs with ATD did not differ significantly from dogs without ATD in most signalment variables. Contrary to previous reports, cardiac disease was not a common concurrent diagnosis in dogs with ATD.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Winter (Rlw0041@auburn.edu).