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Systemic manifestations of Cuterebra infection in dogs and cats: 42 cases (2000–2014)

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 404 Veterinary Emergency and Referral Hospital, 510 Harry Walker Pkwy S, Newmarket, ON L3Y 0B3, Canada.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 4 404 Veterinary Emergency and Referral Hospital, 510 Harry Walker Pkwy S, Newmarket, ON L3Y 0B3, Canada.
  • | 5 404 Veterinary Emergency and Referral Hospital, 510 Harry Walker Pkwy S, Newmarket, ON L3Y 0B3, Canada.
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To document clinical signs in cats and dogs with Cuterebra infection, determine the outcome of infected animals, and determine whether Yorkshire Terriers were more commonly affected than other breeds of dogs.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 22 cats and 20 dogs with Cuterebra infection.

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs and cats with Cuterebra infection were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical and laboratory findings, treatment, duration of hospitalization, and outcome.

RESULTS Most (16/20 [80%]) of the dogs weighed ≤ 4.5 kg (10 lb), and Yorkshire Terriers were overrepresented (8/20 [40%]), compared with dogs of other breeds. Ten (50%) dogs and 3 (14%) cats had systemic inflammatory response syndrome at the time of initial evaluation, and 8 (40%) dogs but none of the cats had disseminated intravascular coagulation. The overall mortality rate was 17% (7/42), but was higher for dogs (6/20 [30%]) than cats (1/22 [4.5%]). All 6 dogs that died weighed ≤ 4.5 kg and had systemic inflammatory response syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or both.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that Cuterebra infection can cause severe systemic illness in small-breed dogs. Yorkshire Terriers were more commonly affected than were dogs of other breeds and, subjectively at least, appeared to be more likely to develop severe systemic illness.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To document clinical signs in cats and dogs with Cuterebra infection, determine the outcome of infected animals, and determine whether Yorkshire Terriers were more commonly affected than other breeds of dogs.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 22 cats and 20 dogs with Cuterebra infection.

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs and cats with Cuterebra infection were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical and laboratory findings, treatment, duration of hospitalization, and outcome.

RESULTS Most (16/20 [80%]) of the dogs weighed ≤ 4.5 kg (10 lb), and Yorkshire Terriers were overrepresented (8/20 [40%]), compared with dogs of other breeds. Ten (50%) dogs and 3 (14%) cats had systemic inflammatory response syndrome at the time of initial evaluation, and 8 (40%) dogs but none of the cats had disseminated intravascular coagulation. The overall mortality rate was 17% (7/42), but was higher for dogs (6/20 [30%]) than cats (1/22 [4.5%]). All 6 dogs that died weighed ≤ 4.5 kg and had systemic inflammatory response syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or both.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that Cuterebra infection can cause severe systemic illness in small-breed dogs. Yorkshire Terriers were more commonly affected than were dogs of other breeds and, subjectively at least, appeared to be more likely to develop severe systemic illness.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Rutland's present address is VCA Canada 404 Veterinary Emergency and Referral Hospital, 510 Harry Walker Pkwy S, Newmarket, ON L3Y 0B3, Canada.

Dr Byl's present address is Lakeshore Veterinary Specialists, 207 W Seven Hills Rd, Port Washington, WI 53074.

Dr. Miniter's present address is Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center (VSEC), 301 Veteran Hwy, Levittown, PA 19056.

Address correspondence to Dr. Rutland (rutland404@gmail.com).