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  • | 4 Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, 333 S Grand St, Third Floor, Lansing, MI 48913.

Contributor Notes

Consultants to the Committee: Misha Robyn, DVM, MPH, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 33033; Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 33033; Karen Beck, DVM, PhD, North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 2 W Edenton St, Raleigh, NC 27601; Marla J. Calico, International Association of Fairs and Expositions, 3043 E Cairo, Springfield, MO 65802; Thomas P. Meehan, DVM, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, 8403 Colesville Rd, Ste 710, Silver Spring, MD 20910; and Stephan Schaefbauer, DVM, MPH, USDA, 100 Bridgeport Dr, Ste 180, South Saint Paul, MN 55075.

This document has not undergone peer review; opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the AVMA.

Address correspondence to Dr. Daly (russell.daly@sdstate.edu).