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Diagnostic Imaging in Veterinary Dental Practice

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  • 1 Pacific Coast Veterinary Dentistry, 511 Saxony Pl, Ste 100, Encinitas, CA 91941.
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 8-month-old 2.3-kg (5.06-lb) neutered male Bolognese dog was evaluated because of a suspected unerupted right mandibular canine tooth. Apparent absence of the tooth was first observed when the patient was neutered 2 months prior to this evaluation. At that time, the left mandibular canine tooth had also failed to erupt. The referring veterinarian observed no other apparently missing teeth, but a class III malocclusion (relative mandibular prognathism) was present, and examination by a veterinary dental specialist was recommended.

On examination, the patient was bright, alert, and responsive. There was no history of systemic disease,

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Tjepkema (j.tjepkemadvm@gmail.com).