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Continuous radiotelemetric monitoring of intragastric pH in a dog with peptic ulceration

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old castrated male Boxer was evaluated for a 5-week history of frequent vomiting, melena, and signs of abdominal pain following accidental ingestion of 5 to ten 15-mg meloxicam tablets (approx ingested dose, 3.1 to 6.2 mg/kg [1.4 to 2.8 mg/lb]).

CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs persisted despite 3 weeks of treatment with sucralfate (41.8 mg/kg [19 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) and omeprazole (0.8 mg/kg [0.36 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peptic ulceration, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirmed the presence of severe proximal duodenal ulceration.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A radiotelemetric pH-monitoring capsule was placed in the gastric fundus under endoscopic guidance for continuous at-home monitoring of intragastric pH and response to treatment. Treatment was continued with sucralfate (as previously prescribed) and omeprazole at an increased administration frequency (0.8 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h). Intragastric pH was consistently ≥ 3.0 for > 75% of the day during treatment, with the exception of 1 day when a single dose of omeprazole was inadvertently missed. Ulceration and clinical signs completely resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Continuous radiotelemetric monitoring of intragastric pH in the dog of this report was useful for confirming that treatment achieved a predetermined target pH and for demonstrating the impact of missed doses. Duodenal ulceration resolved with twice-daily but not once-daily omeprazole administration. Findings suggested that twice-daily administration of omeprazole may be necessary to achieve this target pH and that a pH ≥ 3.0 for 75% of the day may promote healing of peptic ulcers in dogs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old castrated male Boxer was evaluated for a 5-week history of frequent vomiting, melena, and signs of abdominal pain following accidental ingestion of 5 to ten 15-mg meloxicam tablets (approx ingested dose, 3.1 to 6.2 mg/kg [1.4 to 2.8 mg/lb]).

CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs persisted despite 3 weeks of treatment with sucralfate (41.8 mg/kg [19 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) and omeprazole (0.8 mg/kg [0.36 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peptic ulceration, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirmed the presence of severe proximal duodenal ulceration.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A radiotelemetric pH-monitoring capsule was placed in the gastric fundus under endoscopic guidance for continuous at-home monitoring of intragastric pH and response to treatment. Treatment was continued with sucralfate (as previously prescribed) and omeprazole at an increased administration frequency (0.8 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h). Intragastric pH was consistently ≥ 3.0 for > 75% of the day during treatment, with the exception of 1 day when a single dose of omeprazole was inadvertently missed. Ulceration and clinical signs completely resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Continuous radiotelemetric monitoring of intragastric pH in the dog of this report was useful for confirming that treatment achieved a predetermined target pH and for demonstrating the impact of missed doses. Duodenal ulceration resolved with twice-daily but not once-daily omeprazole administration. Findings suggested that twice-daily administration of omeprazole may be necessary to achieve this target pH and that a pH ≥ 3.0 for 75% of the day may promote healing of peptic ulcers in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Tolbert (mtolber2@utk.edu).