• 1 USDA. 2012 census of agriculture, May 2014 edition. Available at: www.agcensus.usda.gov. Accessed Sep 1, 2015.

  • 2 American Association of Swine Veterinarians. AASV board meeting minutes. Available at: www.aasv.org/aasv/board. htm. Accessed Apr 26, 2016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3 Shepherd AJ, Pikel L. Employment, starting salaries, and educational indebtedness of year-2013 graduates of US veterinary medical colleges. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013; 243: 983987.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4 Cima G. Devastating flu, ongoing harm. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015; 247: 434439.

  • 5 USDA hiring veterinarians to fight avian flu. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015; 247: 439.

  • 6 American Association of Avian Pathologists. Available at: www.aaap.info. Accessed Jan 25, 2016.

  • 7 Wenzel JGW, Wright JC. Veterinary accreditation and some new imperatives for national preparedness. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007; 230: 13091312.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8 Hsu CE, Jacobson H, Feldman K, et al. Assessing bioterrorism preparedness and response of rural veterinarians: experiences and training needs. J Vet Med Educ 2008; 35: 262268.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Evaluation of pyramid training as a method to increase diagnostic sampling capacity during an emergency veterinary response to a swine disease outbreak

View More View Less
  • 1 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 2 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 3 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 4 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 5 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 6 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 7 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 8 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 9 Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 10 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 11 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 12 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 13 Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 14 Swine Medicine Education Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and evaluate a pyramid training method for teaching techniques for collection of diagnostic samples from swine.

DESIGN Experimental trial.

SAMPLE 45 veterinary students.

PROCEDURES Participants went through a preinstruction assessment to determine their familiarity with the equipment needed and techniques used to collect samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid from pigs. Participants were then shown a series of videos illustrating the correct equipment and techniques for collecting samples and were provided hands-on pyramid-based instruction wherein a single swine veterinarian trained 2 or 3 participants on each of the techniques and each of those participants, in turn, trained additional participants. Additional assessments were performed after the instruction was completed.

RESULTS Following the instruction phase, percentages of participants able to collect adequate samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid increased, as did scores on a written quiz assessing participants' ability to identify the correct equipment, positioning, and procedures for collection of samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the pyramid training method may be a feasible way to rapidly increase diagnostic sampling capacity during an emergency veterinary response to a swine disease outbreak.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and evaluate a pyramid training method for teaching techniques for collection of diagnostic samples from swine.

DESIGN Experimental trial.

SAMPLE 45 veterinary students.

PROCEDURES Participants went through a preinstruction assessment to determine their familiarity with the equipment needed and techniques used to collect samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid from pigs. Participants were then shown a series of videos illustrating the correct equipment and techniques for collecting samples and were provided hands-on pyramid-based instruction wherein a single swine veterinarian trained 2 or 3 participants on each of the techniques and each of those participants, in turn, trained additional participants. Additional assessments were performed after the instruction was completed.

RESULTS Following the instruction phase, percentages of participants able to collect adequate samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid increased, as did scores on a written quiz assessing participants' ability to identify the correct equipment, positioning, and procedures for collection of samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the pyramid training method may be a feasible way to rapidly increase diagnostic sampling capacity during an emergency veterinary response to a swine disease outbreak.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Karriker (karriker@iastate.edu).

Dr. Canon's present address is Center for Food Security and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.