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What Is Your Diagnosis?

Kate E. Hindley BVSc1, F. Mark Billson BVSc, PhD2, and Victoria Johnson BVSc3
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  • 1 Veterinary Ophthalmology Department, Small Animal Specialist Hospital, Lvl 1, 1 Richardson Pl, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia.
  • | 2 Veterinary Ophthalmology Department, Small Animal Specialist Hospital, Lvl 1, 1 Richardson Pl, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia.
  • | 3 VetCT Specialists, Cowley Rd, Milton, Cambridge, CB4 0WS, England.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Hindley (khindley@sashvets.com).