• 1. Miller WH, Griffin CE, Campbell KL. Congenital and hereditary defects. In: Miller WH, Griffin CE, Campbell KL, eds. Muller & Kirk's small animal dermatology. 7th ed. St Louis: Elsevier Mosby, 2013; 602–604.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Paciello O, Lamagna F, Lamagna B, et al. Ehlers-Danlos-like syndrome in 2 dogs: clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural findings. Vet Clin Pathol 2003; 32: 1318.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. De Paepe A, Malfait F. The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a disorder with many faces. Clin Genet 2012; 82: 111.

  • 4. Smith LT, Wertelecki W, Milstone LM, et al. Human dermatosparaxis: a form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen. Am J Hum Genet 1992; 51: 235244.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Paterson S. Congenital and hereditary skin diseases. In: Manual of skin diseases of the dog and cat. 2nd ed. Oxford, England: Blackwell Publishing, 2008; 251252.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Barrera R, Mañe C, Duran E, et al. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a dog. Can Vet J 2004; 45: 355366.

  • 7. Matthews BR, Lewis GT. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a dog. Can Vet J 1990; 31: 389390.

  • 8. Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, et al. Degenerative, dysplastic and depositional diseases of dermal connective tissue. In: Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, eds. Skin diseases of the dog and cat. 2nd ed. Oxford, England: Blackwell Publishing, 2005;386–389.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Pathology in Practice

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano dell'Emilia, Bologna, Italy.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano dell'Emilia, Bologna, Italy.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano dell'Emilia, Bologna, Italy.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano dell'Emilia, Bologna, Italy.
History

A 4-year-old 7.0-kg (15.4-lb) sexually intact female Dachshund that had a history of self-inflicted wounds was evaluated at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Bologna University because of a skin wound on the ventral aspect of the thorax. The first episode had occurred 6 months prior and involved a cutaneous wound in the thoracic region; this was followed 2 months later by development of a cutaneous lesion in the right shoulder region. The owner had also noticed other minor skin lesions on the dog's flanks. During the few days preceding the evaluation, the dog had started to bite and lick

History

A 4-year-old 7.0-kg (15.4-lb) sexually intact female Dachshund that had a history of self-inflicted wounds was evaluated at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Bologna University because of a skin wound on the ventral aspect of the thorax. The first episode had occurred 6 months prior and involved a cutaneous wound in the thoracic region; this was followed 2 months later by development of a cutaneous lesion in the right shoulder region. The owner had also noticed other minor skin lesions on the dog's flanks. During the few days preceding the evaluation, the dog had started to bite and lick

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Famigli-Bergamini (paolo.famigli@unibo.it).