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Partial gastrectomy for resection of a gastric leiomyoma in a guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

Sara M. GardhouseWilliam T. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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David Sanchez-Migallon GuzmanDepartment of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Miranda J. SadarWilliam T. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Anthony J. DeRouenWilliam T. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Daniel S. BucyWilliam T. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Adeyemi O. AdedejiDepartment of Pathology, Immunology, and Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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William VernauDepartment of Pathology, Immunology, and Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Kerriann M. CaseyDepartment of Pathology, Immunology, and Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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F. Charles MohrDepartment of Pathology, Immunology, and Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Michele A. SteffeyDepartment of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 4-year-old sexually intact male pet guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) was evaluated for a routine wellness examination.

CLINICAL FINDINGS During physical examination, a small mass was palpated in the cranial aspect of the abdomen. Abdominal radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were suggestive of a gastric mass. Cytologic evaluation of a fine-needle aspirate of the mass was indicative of spindle cell proliferation most consistent with a sarcoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The patient was anesthetized, and an exploratory laparotomy and partial gastrectomy were performed to resect the gastric mass. Histologic and immunohistochemical examinations of the mass revealed that it was a gastric leiomyoma. The patient recovered from surgery without complications. No evidence of mass recurrence was observed during an abdominal ultrasonographic examination performed approximately 19 months after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this was the first report of the clinical diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of a gastric neoplasm in a guinea pig. Gastric leiomyomas are not uncommon in guinea pigs, and although benign, they can cause clinical signs if they become large enough to impair gastric function. Gastrointestinal surgery should be considered as a treatment option for guinea pigs with similar gastric neoplasms.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 4-year-old sexually intact male pet guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) was evaluated for a routine wellness examination.

CLINICAL FINDINGS During physical examination, a small mass was palpated in the cranial aspect of the abdomen. Abdominal radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were suggestive of a gastric mass. Cytologic evaluation of a fine-needle aspirate of the mass was indicative of spindle cell proliferation most consistent with a sarcoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The patient was anesthetized, and an exploratory laparotomy and partial gastrectomy were performed to resect the gastric mass. Histologic and immunohistochemical examinations of the mass revealed that it was a gastric leiomyoma. The patient recovered from surgery without complications. No evidence of mass recurrence was observed during an abdominal ultrasonographic examination performed approximately 19 months after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this was the first report of the clinical diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of a gastric neoplasm in a guinea pig. Gastric leiomyomas are not uncommon in guinea pigs, and although benign, they can cause clinical signs if they become large enough to impair gastric function. Gastrointestinal surgery should be considered as a treatment option for guinea pigs with similar gastric neoplasms.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Sadar's present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK 57N 5B4, Canada.

Dr. Adedeji's present address is College of Veterinary Medicine, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ 85308.

Address correspondence to Dr. Sanchez-Migallon Guzman (guzman@ucdavis.edu).