Opportunities for incorporating the human-animal bond in companion animal practice

Oliver KneslZoetis Inc, 100 Campus Dr, PO Box 651, Florham Park, NJ 07869.

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Benjamin L. HartDepartment of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

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Aubrey H. FineCollege of Education and Integrative Studies, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 91768.

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Leslie Cooper1304 Pacific Dr, Davis, CA 95616.

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Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Knesl (oliver.knesl@zoetis.com).
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