• 1. Claes A, Ball BA, Corbin CJ. Anti-Müllerian hormone as a diagnostic marker for equine cryptorchidism in three cases with equivocal testosterone concentrations. J Equine Vet Sci 2014; 34: 442445.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Ball BA, Conley AJ, Grundy SA, et al. Expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in the equine testis. Theriogenology 2008; 69: 624631.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Rey R, Lordereau-Richard I, Carel JC, et al. Anti-Müllerian hormone and testosterone serum levels are inversely related during normal and precocious pubertal development. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1993; 77: 12201226.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Claes A, Ball BA, Almeida J. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations in stallions: developmental changes, seasonal variation, and differences between intact stallions, cryptorchid stallions and geldings. Theriogenology 2013; 79: 12291235.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Murase H, Saitoi S, Amaya T, et al. Anti-Müllerian hormone as an indicator of hemi-castrated unilateral cryptorchid horses. J Equine Sci 2015; 26: 1520.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Jann HW, Rains JR. Diagnostic ultrasonography for evaluation of cryptorchidism in horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1990; 196: 297300.

  • 7. Schambourg MA, Farley JA, Marcoux M, et al. Use of transabdominal ultrasonography to determine the location of cryptorchid testes in the horse. Equine Vet J 2006; 38: 242245.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Lu KG. Clinical diagnosis of the cryptorchid stallion. Clin Tech Equine Pract 2005; 4: 250256.

Advertisement

Theriogenology Question of the Month

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 5 Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
History

A 2-year-old 454.5-kg (1,000-lb) Saddlebred stallion was admitted to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for castration. Three days prior to admission, the referring veterinarian attempted to castrate the horse. The left testis was undescended and in an abdominal location. Surgery via an inguinal approach did not enable the veterinarian to locate the testis. Therefore, the veterinarian did not remove the contralateral right testis, which was located in the scrotum, and the stallion was referred to our facility for evaluation and subsequent removal of both testes.

Results of physical examination and initial hematologic analysis of the stallion conducted

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Canisso (canisso@illinois.edu).