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  • 1 Units of Diagnostic Imaging, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
  • | 2 Small Animal Internal Medicine, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
History

A 12-year-old 7.4-kg (16-lb) neutered male Boston Terrier was referred because of a progressive severe dry cough of 1 week's duration. The dog was initially treated with doxycycline and meloxicam, which initially improved the cough. The respiratory signs, however, worsened after 2 days of treatment, as the cough became substantially worse. In addition, the dog started to salivate and became increasingly anorexic.

At the time of hospital admission, the dog was moderately dehydrated. A systolic heart murmur (grade II/VI) over the left cardiac apex was detected. Auscultation of the thorax revealed normal lung sounds. Initial findings on CBC and

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Le Roux (alex.leroux@amcny.org).