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Rabies surveillance in the United States during 2014

Benjamin P. MonroePoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Pamela YagerPoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Jesse BlantonPoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Meseret G. BirhanePoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Ashutosh WadhwaPoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Lillian OrciariPoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Brett PetersenPoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Ryan WallacePoxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Contributor Notes

During 2014, 50 states and Puerto Rico reported 6,033 rabid animals and 1 human case of rabies to the CDC, representing a 2.83% increase from the 5,865 rabid animals and 3 human cases of rabies reported in 2013. Of the 6,034 cases of rabies, 5,588 (92.61%) involved wildlife. Relative contributions by the major animal groups were as follows: 1,822 (30.20%) raccoons, 1,756 (29.10%) bats, 1,588 (26.32%) skunks, 311 (5.15%) foxes, 272 (4.51%) cats, 78 (1.29%) cattle, and 59 (0.98%) dogs. Compared with 2013, there was a substantial increase in the number of samples submitted for rabies testing. The 1 human case of rabies involved a 52-year-old male in Missouri. Infection was determined to be a result of a rabies virus variant associated with Perimyotis subflavus; however, no specific exposure event was identified.

Address correspondence to Mr. Monroe (ihd2@cdc.gov).