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Ophthalmic variables in rehabilitated juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 3 InTown Veterinary Group, Bulger Veterinary Hospital, 247 Chickering Rd, North Andover, MA 01845.
  • | 4 New England Aquarium, 1 Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110.
  • | 5 New England Aquarium, 1 Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine central corneal thickness (total corneal thickness [TCT], epithelial thickness [ET], and stromal thickness [ST]), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii).

DESIGN

Prospective cross-sectional study.

ANIMALS

25 healthy rehabilitated juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

PROCEDURES

Body weight and straight-line standard carapace length (SCL) were recorded. All turtles underwent a complete anterior segment ophthalmic examination. Central TCT, ET, ST, and ACD were determined by use of a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography device. Intraocular pressure was determined with a rebound tonometer; the horse setting was used to measure IOP in all 25 turtles, and the undefined setting was also used to measure IOP in 20 turtles. For each variable, 3 measurements were obtained bilaterally. The mean was calculated for each eye and used for analysis purposes.

RESULTS

The mean ± SD body weight and SCL were 3.85 ± 1.05 kg (8.47 ± 2.31 lb) and 29 ± 3 cm, respectively. The mean ± SD TCT, ET, ST, and ACD were 288 ± 23 μm, 100 ± 6 μm, 190 ± 19 μm, and 581 ± 128 μm, respectively. Mean ± SD IOP was 6.5 ± 1.0 mm Hg when measured with the horse setting and 3.8 ± 1.1 mm Hg when measured with the undefined setting.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided preliminary reference ranges for objective assessment of ophthalmic variables in healthy juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Gornik's present address is Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 807 Camp Horne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pirie (chris.pirie@tufts.edu).