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Effects of an optional clinical skills laboratory on surgical performance of third-year veterinary students

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether addition of an optional clinical skills laboratory (OCSL) to the traditional surgery curriculum would affect total surgery time or incision closure time in veterinary students performing ovariohysterectomy of a dog during a third-year surgery course.

DESIGN

Retrospective and prospective study of veterinary student attendance at OCSL sessions and student performance during the third-year surgery course.

SAMPLE

Students from the classes of 2012, 2013, and 2014 at the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

PROCEDURES

For all students, total surgery time and incision closure time were recorded when students performed an ovariohysterectomy of a dog during their third-year live-animal surgery course. Times were analyzed to identify differences among classes and determine whether times were associated with number of OCSL sessions attended, previous experience performing ovariohysterectomies, or enrollment in an elective clinical skills course.

RESULTS

Total surgery and incision closure times were not significantly different between students in the class of 2012 (no access to the OCSL prior to the third-year surgery course) and students in the class of 2013 (ie, access to 4 OCSL sessions during the spring semester prior to the third-year surgery course). However, times were significantly shorter for students in the class of 2014 (ie, students who had access to OCSL sessions during the 3 semesters prior to the third-year surgery course) than for students in the other 2 classes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that attendance in the OCSL sessions was associated with improvements in surgical performance, as reflected in faster total surgery and incision closure times while performing an ovariohysterectomy during the third-year surgery course.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether addition of an optional clinical skills laboratory (OCSL) to the traditional surgery curriculum would affect total surgery time or incision closure time in veterinary students performing ovariohysterectomy of a dog during a third-year surgery course.

DESIGN

Retrospective and prospective study of veterinary student attendance at OCSL sessions and student performance during the third-year surgery course.

SAMPLE

Students from the classes of 2012, 2013, and 2014 at the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

PROCEDURES

For all students, total surgery time and incision closure time were recorded when students performed an ovariohysterectomy of a dog during their third-year live-animal surgery course. Times were analyzed to identify differences among classes and determine whether times were associated with number of OCSL sessions attended, previous experience performing ovariohysterectomies, or enrollment in an elective clinical skills course.

RESULTS

Total surgery and incision closure times were not significantly different between students in the class of 2012 (no access to the OCSL prior to the third-year surgery course) and students in the class of 2013 (ie, access to 4 OCSL sessions during the spring semester prior to the third-year surgery course). However, times were significantly shorter for students in the class of 2014 (ie, students who had access to OCSL sessions during the 3 semesters prior to the third-year surgery course) than for students in the other 2 classes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that attendance in the OCSL sessions was associated with improvements in surgical performance, as reflected in faster total surgery and incision closure times while performing an ovariohysterectomy during the third-year surgery course.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Zeugschmidt's present address is Hassayampa Veterinary Services, 51301 N US Hwy 60/89, Wickenburg, AZ 85390.

Dr. Farnsworth's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Dr. Carroll's present address is Chino Valley Equine Hospital, 2945 English Pl, Chino Hills, CA 91709.

Dr. Lucia's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.

Dr. Hinckley's present address is North Cascades Veterinary Hospital, 200 Murdock St, Sedro Woolley, WA 98284.

Dr. Cary's present address is PO Box 647010, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cary (jcary@vetmed.wsu.edu).