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Development of an optional clinical skills laboratory for surgical skills training of veterinary students

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Carroll's present address is Chino Valley Equine Hospital, 2945 English Pl, Chino Hills, CA 91709.

Dr. Lucia's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.

Dr. Farnsworth's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Dr. Hinckley's present address is North Cascades Veterinary Hospital, 200 Murdock St, Sedro Woolley, WA 98284.

Dr. Zeugschmidt's present address is Hassayampa Veterinary Services, 51301 N US Hwy 60/89, Wickenburg, AZ 85390.

Dr. Cary's present address is PO Box 647010, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cary (jcary@vetmed.wsu.edu).