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Pathology in Practice

Kirsty A. Husby DVM1 and Keiichi Kuroki DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 Veterinary Health Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
History

An approximately 12-hour-old Thoroughbred-Hanoverian crossbreed colt was evaluated by the University of Missouri Equine Ambulatory Service during a routine new foal examination. The dam of the foal was a maiden mare. The foal reportedly needed some assistance with rising initially but had nursed well since birth and eventually was able to rise on its own. The umbilicus had been dipped in chlorhexidine solution, and the foal had been observed to pass only a very small amount of meconium. The following morning, at approximately 24 hours after birth, the foal was found in lateral recumbency and unwilling to rise. The

History

An approximately 12-hour-old Thoroughbred-Hanoverian crossbreed colt was evaluated by the University of Missouri Equine Ambulatory Service during a routine new foal examination. The dam of the foal was a maiden mare. The foal reportedly needed some assistance with rising initially but had nursed well since birth and eventually was able to rise on its own. The umbilicus had been dipped in chlorhexidine solution, and the foal had been observed to pass only a very small amount of meconium. The following morning, at approximately 24 hours after birth, the foal was found in lateral recumbency and unwilling to rise. The

Contributor Notes

Dr. Husby's present address is College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kuroki (kurokik@missouri.edu).