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Urinary bladder retroversion and neourethrocystostomy for treatment of inadvertent prostatectomy and urethrectomy in a dog

Kathryn FlesherVeterinary Specialists and Emergency Services, 825 White Spruce Blvd, Rochester, NY 14623.

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Chick WeisseDepartment of Interventional Radiology and Endoscopy, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Spruce Street, PA 19104.

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Allyson BerentDepartment of Interventional Radiology and Endoscopy, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Spruce Street, PA 19104.

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Rebecca LinDepartment of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Spruce Street, PA 19104.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-month-old male Newfoundland was examined because of an inability to urinate, lethargy, inappetence, and intermittent vomiting that first became evident after bilateral cryptorchidectomy 2 days previously. The patient was referred for further evaluation and treatment.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Results of physical examination, serum biochemical analysis, and abdominocentesis led to a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. Retrograde cystography indicated urinary tract obstruction. In view of the history of recent elective cryptorchidectomy, a diagnosis of uroperitoneum with urethral obstruction secondary to iatrogenic prostatectomy and urethrectomy was made.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME During a ventral midline celiotomy, the inadvertent prostatectomy and urethrectomy were found to have resulted in insufficient urethral length for primary repair. Surgical repair of the urethral defect was achieved by means of a novel technique of bladder retroversion and neourethrocystostomy at the apex of the bladder. A urethral stricture evident 1.5 months after surgery was initially treated with balloon dilatation, followed by temporary and then permanent placement of a self-expanding metallic stent. At the last follow-up 6.6 years after stent placement, the dog remained continent while receiving phenylpropanolamine and the owner was highly satisfied with the outcome.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Caudal intraabdominal bladder retroversion with apex neourethrocystostomy may be a viable alternative to more complex urethral lengthening procedures in dogs and can potentially preserve lower urinary tract function. This treatment might be considered for patients with urethral trauma or malignant neoplasia necessitating extensive urethral resection. Urethral strictures may be effectively managed with stenting.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-month-old male Newfoundland was examined because of an inability to urinate, lethargy, inappetence, and intermittent vomiting that first became evident after bilateral cryptorchidectomy 2 days previously. The patient was referred for further evaluation and treatment.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Results of physical examination, serum biochemical analysis, and abdominocentesis led to a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. Retrograde cystography indicated urinary tract obstruction. In view of the history of recent elective cryptorchidectomy, a diagnosis of uroperitoneum with urethral obstruction secondary to iatrogenic prostatectomy and urethrectomy was made.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME During a ventral midline celiotomy, the inadvertent prostatectomy and urethrectomy were found to have resulted in insufficient urethral length for primary repair. Surgical repair of the urethral defect was achieved by means of a novel technique of bladder retroversion and neourethrocystostomy at the apex of the bladder. A urethral stricture evident 1.5 months after surgery was initially treated with balloon dilatation, followed by temporary and then permanent placement of a self-expanding metallic stent. At the last follow-up 6.6 years after stent placement, the dog remained continent while receiving phenylpropanolamine and the owner was highly satisfied with the outcome.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Caudal intraabdominal bladder retroversion with apex neourethrocystostomy may be a viable alternative to more complex urethral lengthening procedures in dogs and can potentially preserve lower urinary tract function. This treatment might be considered for patients with urethral trauma or malignant neoplasia necessitating extensive urethral resection. Urethral strictures may be effectively managed with stenting.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Lin's present address is Southeast Veterinary Referral Center, 6394 S Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33143 (Lin).

Address correspondence to Dr. Weisse (chick.weisse@amcny.org).