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Outcomes of ureteral surgery and ureteral stenting in cats: 117 cases (2006–2014)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate and compare outcomes in cats following ureteral surgery or ureteral stent placement.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 117 cats.

PROCEDURES Data regarding signalment, history, concurrent disease, clinical signs, clinicopathologic tests, surgical procedures, and perioperative complications (including death) were recorded. Follow-up data, including presence of signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease, chronic urinary tract infection, reobstruction, and death, if applicable, were obtained by records review or telephone contact with owners. Variables of interest were compared statistically between cats treated with and without stent placement. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were performed to assess differences in survival time between cats with and without ureteral stents.

RESULTS Perioperative complications referable to the urinary tract were identified in 6 of 43 (14%) cats that had ≥ 1 ureteral stent placed and 2 of 74 (3%) cats that underwent ureteral surgery without stenting. Perioperative mortality rates were similar between cats with (4/43 [9%]) and without (6/74 [8%]) stents. After surgery, signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic urinary tract infection were significantly more common among cats with than cats without stents. Nineteen of 87 (22%) cats with follow-up information available had recurrent obstruction; incidence of reobstruction did not differ between cats with and without stents. Median survival time did not differ between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The potential for signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic infection, particularly among cats that receive ureteral stents, warrants appropriate client counseling. Judicious long-term follow-up for detection of reobstruction is recommended.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate and compare outcomes in cats following ureteral surgery or ureteral stent placement.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 117 cats.

PROCEDURES Data regarding signalment, history, concurrent disease, clinical signs, clinicopathologic tests, surgical procedures, and perioperative complications (including death) were recorded. Follow-up data, including presence of signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease, chronic urinary tract infection, reobstruction, and death, if applicable, were obtained by records review or telephone contact with owners. Variables of interest were compared statistically between cats treated with and without stent placement. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were performed to assess differences in survival time between cats with and without ureteral stents.

RESULTS Perioperative complications referable to the urinary tract were identified in 6 of 43 (14%) cats that had ≥ 1 ureteral stent placed and 2 of 74 (3%) cats that underwent ureteral surgery without stenting. Perioperative mortality rates were similar between cats with (4/43 [9%]) and without (6/74 [8%]) stents. After surgery, signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic urinary tract infection were significantly more common among cats with than cats without stents. Nineteen of 87 (22%) cats with follow-up information available had recurrent obstruction; incidence of reobstruction did not differ between cats with and without stents. Median survival time did not differ between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The potential for signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic infection, particularly among cats that receive ureteral stents, warrants appropriate client counseling. Judicious long-term follow-up for detection of reobstruction is recommended.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Wormser (cwormser@vet.upenn.edu).