• 1. Van Metre DCHouse JKSmith BP, et al. Obstructive urolithiasis in ruminants: medical treatment and urethral surgery. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 1996;18:317327.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Van Metre DCFecteau GHouse JK, et al. Obstructive urolithiasis in ruminants: surgical management and prevention. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 1996;19:275289.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Robinson MRNorris RDSur RL, et al. Urolithiasis: not just a 2-legged animal disease. J Urol 2008;179:4652.

  • 4. Chigerwe MShiraki ROlstad EC, et al. Mineral composition of urinary calculi from potbellied pigs with urolithiasis: 50 cases (1982–2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013;243:389393.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Streeter RNWashburn KEMcCauley CT. Percutaneous tube cystostomy and vesicular irrigation for treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in a goat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:546549.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Fortier LAGregg AJErb HN, et al. Caprine obstructive urolithiasis: requirement for 2nd surgical intervention and mortality after percutaneous tube cystostomy, surgical tube cystostomy, or urinary bladder marsupialization. Vet Surg 2004;33:661667.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Rakestraw PCFubini SLGilbert RO, et al. Tube cystostomy for treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants. Vet Surg 1995;24:498505.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Van Metre DCFubini SL. Ovine and caprine urolithiasis: another piece of the puzzle. Vet Surg 2006;35:413416.

  • 9. MacLeay JM. Urolithiasis. In: Smith BP, ed. Large animal internal medicine. 4th ed. St Louis: Mosby, 2008;950958.

  • 10. Mavangira VCornish JMAngelos JA. Effect of ammonium chloride supplementation on urinary pH and urinary fractional excretion of electrolytes in goats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:12991304.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Janke JJOsterstock JBWashburn KE, et al. Use of Walpole's solution for treatment of goats with urolithiasis: 25 cases (2001–2006). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009;234:249252.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Halland SKHouse JKGeorge LW. Urethroscopy and laser lithotripsy for the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in goats and pot-bellied pigs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:18311834.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13. George JWHird DWGeorge LW. Serum biochemical abnormalities in goats with uroliths: 107 cases (1992–2003). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007;230:101106.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Bonanno PJLanders DERock DE. Bladder drainage with the suprapubic catheter needle. Obstet Gynecol 1970;35:807812.

Advertisement

Use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter for management of obstructive urolithiasis in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs: 69 cases (2000–2014)

Munashe Chigerwe BVSC, MPH, PhD1, Meera C. Heller DVM, PhD2, Christie C. Balcomb BVSC3, and John A. Angelos DVM, PhD4
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter (PTC) for urinary bladder drainage in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 43 goats, 10 sheep, and 16 potbellied pigs (all males) with obstructive urolithiasis evaluated at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

PROCEDURES Medical records of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs examined because of obstructive urolithiasis from January 2000 through December 2014 were reviewed. Records of animals for which a standard PTC had been placed into the urinary bladder as part of disease management were selected. Data were collected regarding signalment, complications associated with PTC placement, and duration of PTC placement prior to removal.

RESULTS 42 of 43 goats, 5 of 10 sheep, and all potbellied pigs were castrated. Median (range) duration of PTC placement was 2 (1 to 4) days for goats, 1 (1 to 4) day for sheep, and 1 (1 to 3) day for potbellied pigs. Complications associated with PTC placement included blockage of the catheter by urine sediment, perforation of the cecum, and migration of the catheter out of the urinary bladder.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of a PTC into the urinary bladder allowed for effective stabilization of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis while acid-base and electrolyte imbalances were corrected. Use of a PTC should be considered for urinary bladder drainage during medical management or prior to surgical management of obstructive urolithiasis for these species.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Chigerwe (mchigerwe@ucdavis.edu).