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Efficacy of intranasal vaccination with a multivalent vaccine containing temperature-sensitive modified-live bovine herpesvirus type 1 for protection of seronegative and seropositive calves against respiratory disease

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  • 1 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 3 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 5 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 6 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 7 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 8 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.
  • | 9 Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis Inc, 333 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI 49009.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate efficacy and duration of immunity of the bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) fraction of a trivalent vaccine also containing parainfluenza virus-3 and bovine respiratory syncytial virus fractions administered intranasally (IN) for protection of calves against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR).

DESIGN Controlled challenge study.

ANIMALS 120 dairy calves (3 to 8 days old) seronegative for antibody against BHV-1 (experiments 1 and 2) or seropositive for maternally derived antibody against BHV-1 (experiment 3).

PROCEDURES In 3 separate experiments, calves were vaccinated IN via 2 nostrils (experiment 1) or 1 nostril (experiments 2 and 3) with a vaccine containing or not containing a BHV-1 fraction. For seronegative calves, the test vaccine contained a minimum immunizing dose of BHV-1; for seropositive calves, it contained a commercial dose of BHV-1. Calves were challenged IN with virulent BHV-1 on day 28 or 193 (seronegative calves) or day 105 (seropositive calves) after vaccination to evaluate vaccine efficacy. Frequency and duration of clinical signs, rectal temperatures, virus shedding, and serologic responses were compared between treatment groups within experiments.

RESULTS In all experiments, BHV-1 vaccinated calves had lower frequencies or shorter durations of clinical signs of IBR than did control calves. Following viral challenge, peak rectal temperatures and degrees of virus shedding were lower and serologic responses were higher in vaccinated versus control calves.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE IN vaccination against BHV-1 protected all calves against clinical IBR disease, regardless of serologic status at the time of vaccination, and suppressed virus shedding. A single dose of this IN vaccine has the potential to protect seronegative calves for at least 193 days and override maternally derived antibody to protect seropositive calves for at least 105 days.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Mahan (suman.mahan@zoetis.com).