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Evaluation of local toxic effects and outcomes for dogs undergoing marginal tumor excision with intralesional cisplatin-impregnated bead placement for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas: 62 cases (2009–2012)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 2 Department of Oncology, Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 807 Camp Horne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.
  • | 3 Department of Surgery, Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 807 Camp Horne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.
  • | 4 Department of Oncology, Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 807 Camp Horne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcomes for dogs following marginal tumor excision and intralesional placement of cisplatin-impregnated beads for the treatment of cutaneous or subcutaneous soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) and assess local toxic effects of cisplatin-impregnated beads in these patients.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 62 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with STSs treated with marginal excision and intralesional placement of cisplatin-impregnated beads. Patient signalment; tumor location, type, and grade; dates of tumor resection and bead placement; number of beads placed; and concurrent treatments were recorded. Data regarding toxicosis at the bead site (up to the time of suture removal) and tumor recurrence were collected; variables of interest were evaluated for associations with these outcomes, and systemic adverse effects (if any) were recorded.

RESULTS 24 of 51 (47%) evaluated dogs had toxicosis at bead placement sites (classified as mild [n = 12] or moderate [10] in most). Fifteen of 51 (29%) tumors recurred. Median disease-free interval was not reached for dogs with grade 1 and 2 STSs, whereas that for dogs with grade 3 STSs was 148 days. Disease-free survival rates of dogs with grade 1 and 2 tumors at 1, 2, and 3 years were 88%, 75%, and 64%, respectively. One dog was treated for presumptive systemic toxicosis but recovered with medical treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cisplatin-impregnated beads were generally well tolerated; good results were achieved for dogs with grade 1 or 2 STSs. Prospective, controlled studies are needed to determine efficacy of this treatment for preventing recurrence of marginally excised STSs in dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcomes for dogs following marginal tumor excision and intralesional placement of cisplatin-impregnated beads for the treatment of cutaneous or subcutaneous soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) and assess local toxic effects of cisplatin-impregnated beads in these patients.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 62 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with STSs treated with marginal excision and intralesional placement of cisplatin-impregnated beads. Patient signalment; tumor location, type, and grade; dates of tumor resection and bead placement; number of beads placed; and concurrent treatments were recorded. Data regarding toxicosis at the bead site (up to the time of suture removal) and tumor recurrence were collected; variables of interest were evaluated for associations with these outcomes, and systemic adverse effects (if any) were recorded.

RESULTS 24 of 51 (47%) evaluated dogs had toxicosis at bead placement sites (classified as mild [n = 12] or moderate [10] in most). Fifteen of 51 (29%) tumors recurred. Median disease-free interval was not reached for dogs with grade 1 and 2 STSs, whereas that for dogs with grade 3 STSs was 148 days. Disease-free survival rates of dogs with grade 1 and 2 tumors at 1, 2, and 3 years were 88%, 75%, and 64%, respectively. One dog was treated for presumptive systemic toxicosis but recovered with medical treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cisplatin-impregnated beads were generally well tolerated; good results were achieved for dogs with grade 1 or 2 STSs. Prospective, controlled studies are needed to determine efficacy of this treatment for preventing recurrence of marginally excised STSs in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Newman (rnewman@pvs-ec.com).