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End-to-end ureteral anastomosis and double-pigtail ureteral stent placement for treatment of iatrogenic ureteral trauma in two dogs

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-month-old spayed female Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier and 8-month-old spayed female Shih Tzu were referred because of complications related to inadvertent ureteral ligation and transection during recent ovariohysterectomy.

Clinical Findings—The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier had a 2-day history of stranguria and polyuria that began after ovariohysterectomy. Initial examination findings were unremarkable with the exception of high rectal temperature. The Shih Tzu had a 10-day history of pyrexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and stranguria that began after ovariohysterectomy. On examination, the dog had signs of depression; clinicopathologic tests revealed hypoalbuminemia, neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed for both dogs, revealing severe unilateral pyelectasia and hydroureter (proximal portion).

Treatment and Outcome—Both dogs underwent exploratory celiotomy; ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Ventral cystotomy was performed to allow retrograde placement of a double-pigtail ureteral stent into the affected ureter and renal pelvis. End-to-end ureteral anastomosis was performed over the stent with the aid of an operating microscope. Stent position was confirmed via fluoroscopy, and incisions were closed routinely. Dogs continued to have intermittent signs of stranguria until stent removal via cystoscopy 6 or 7 weeks after surgery. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract was performed 2 or 4 months after surgery, revealing resolution of pyelectasia and hydroureter.

Clinical Relevance—The surgical technique used provided a viable option for preserving renal function in dogs with focal, iatrogenic ureteral trauma. Use of a ureteral stent facilitated ureteral anastomosis and minimized postoperative complications.

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-month-old spayed female Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier and 8-month-old spayed female Shih Tzu were referred because of complications related to inadvertent ureteral ligation and transection during recent ovariohysterectomy.

Clinical Findings—The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier had a 2-day history of stranguria and polyuria that began after ovariohysterectomy. Initial examination findings were unremarkable with the exception of high rectal temperature. The Shih Tzu had a 10-day history of pyrexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and stranguria that began after ovariohysterectomy. On examination, the dog had signs of depression; clinicopathologic tests revealed hypoalbuminemia, neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed for both dogs, revealing severe unilateral pyelectasia and hydroureter (proximal portion).

Treatment and Outcome—Both dogs underwent exploratory celiotomy; ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Ventral cystotomy was performed to allow retrograde placement of a double-pigtail ureteral stent into the affected ureter and renal pelvis. End-to-end ureteral anastomosis was performed over the stent with the aid of an operating microscope. Stent position was confirmed via fluoroscopy, and incisions were closed routinely. Dogs continued to have intermittent signs of stranguria until stent removal via cystoscopy 6 or 7 weeks after surgery. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract was performed 2 or 4 months after surgery, revealing resolution of pyelectasia and hydroureter.

Clinical Relevance—The surgical technique used provided a viable option for preserving renal function in dogs with focal, iatrogenic ureteral trauma. Use of a ureteral stent facilitated ureteral anastomosis and minimized postoperative complications.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Wormser (cwormser@vet.upenn.edu).