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Effect of tooth extraction on stomatitis in cats: 95 cases (2000–2013)

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term response of cats with stomatitis to tooth extraction.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—95 cats with stomatitis.

Procedures—Medical records of cats with stomatitis that was treated with tooth extraction during a 14-year period were reviewed. Demographic information and diagnostic results were recorded as well as surgical procedure, including full-mouth extraction (FME) versus partial-mouth extraction (PME), and specifics of medical management. Patients were categorized according to response to treatment.

Results—Median postoperative follow-up time was 231 days (range, 33 to 2,655 days). Of 95 cats, 6 (6.3%) had no improvement and 25 (26.3%) had little improvement in stomatitis following tooth extraction and extended medical management (EMM). Following tooth extraction, 37 (39.0%) cats had substantial clinical improvement and 27 (28.4%) cats had complete resolution of stomatitis; of these 64 cats, 44 (68.8%) required EMM for a finite period to achieve positive outcomes. Extent of tooth extraction (PME vs FME) was not associated with overall response to treatment. At initial recheck examination, a better long-term response to tooth extraction was observed in patients with resolution of abnormal behavior (OR, 7.2), decrease in oral inflammation (OR, 3.5), and lack of need for follow-up medical management with antimicrobials (OR, 3.7).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Extraction of teeth in areas of oral inflammation provided substantial improvement or complete resolution of stomatitis in more than two-thirds of affected cats. Full-mouth extraction did not appear to provide additional benefit over PME. Most cats with stomatitis may require EMM to achieve substantial clinical improvement or complete resolution. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;246:654–660)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term response of cats with stomatitis to tooth extraction.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—95 cats with stomatitis.

Procedures—Medical records of cats with stomatitis that was treated with tooth extraction during a 14-year period were reviewed. Demographic information and diagnostic results were recorded as well as surgical procedure, including full-mouth extraction (FME) versus partial-mouth extraction (PME), and specifics of medical management. Patients were categorized according to response to treatment.

Results—Median postoperative follow-up time was 231 days (range, 33 to 2,655 days). Of 95 cats, 6 (6.3%) had no improvement and 25 (26.3%) had little improvement in stomatitis following tooth extraction and extended medical management (EMM). Following tooth extraction, 37 (39.0%) cats had substantial clinical improvement and 27 (28.4%) cats had complete resolution of stomatitis; of these 64 cats, 44 (68.8%) required EMM for a finite period to achieve positive outcomes. Extent of tooth extraction (PME vs FME) was not associated with overall response to treatment. At initial recheck examination, a better long-term response to tooth extraction was observed in patients with resolution of abnormal behavior (OR, 7.2), decrease in oral inflammation (OR, 3.5), and lack of need for follow-up medical management with antimicrobials (OR, 3.7).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Extraction of teeth in areas of oral inflammation provided substantial improvement or complete resolution of stomatitis in more than two-thirds of affected cats. Full-mouth extraction did not appear to provide additional benefit over PME. Most cats with stomatitis may require EMM to achieve substantial clinical improvement or complete resolution. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;246:654–660)

Contributor Notes

Dr. Jennings’ present address is Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, 301 Veterans Hwy, Levittown, PA 19056.

Dr. Lewis’ present address is NorthStar Vets, 315 Robbinsville Allen-town Rd, Robbinsville, NJ 08691.

Presented in part at the 26th Annual Veterinary Dental Forum, Seattle, November 2012; the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine House Officer Research Day, Philadelphia, June 2014; and the 28th Annual Veterinary Dental Forum, Atlanta, November 2014.

Address correspondence to Dr. Jennings (mjennings.vmd@gmail.com).