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Multiple magnetic gastrointestinal foreign bodies in a dog

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Abstract

Case Description—A 3-year-old castrated male Yorkshire Terrier was referred because of a 3-day history of vomiting, hyporexia, and lethargy after suspected ingestion of magnetic desk toys. Multiple metallic gastric foreign bodies were visible on radiographic views obtained 24 hours previously by the referring veterinarian.

Clinical Findings—On physical examination of the dog, findings included moderate dyspnea, signs of pain in the cranial portion of the abdomen, hypothermia, and tachycardia. Repeated radiography revealed moderate pleural effusion and the presence of several round metallic foreign bodies in a linear ring formation in the distal aspect of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

Treatment and Outcome—Endoscopy was performed, at which time the dog became increasingly dyspneic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. Thoracocentesis was performed, and a large volume of septic exudate was removed from the left hemithorax. Exploratory surgery of the thoracic and abdominal cavities was performed, during which the magnetic foreign bodies were removed and esophageal and gastric perforations were debrided and closed. The dog died following acute cardiac arrest 48 hours after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Ingestion of multiple magnetic foreign bodies carries a high risk of gastrointestinal tract perforation, volvulus, and obstruction. Immediate surgical intervention is recommended in such cases and would have likely improved the outcome for the dog of this report.

Abstract

Case Description—A 3-year-old castrated male Yorkshire Terrier was referred because of a 3-day history of vomiting, hyporexia, and lethargy after suspected ingestion of magnetic desk toys. Multiple metallic gastric foreign bodies were visible on radiographic views obtained 24 hours previously by the referring veterinarian.

Clinical Findings—On physical examination of the dog, findings included moderate dyspnea, signs of pain in the cranial portion of the abdomen, hypothermia, and tachycardia. Repeated radiography revealed moderate pleural effusion and the presence of several round metallic foreign bodies in a linear ring formation in the distal aspect of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

Treatment and Outcome—Endoscopy was performed, at which time the dog became increasingly dyspneic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. Thoracocentesis was performed, and a large volume of septic exudate was removed from the left hemithorax. Exploratory surgery of the thoracic and abdominal cavities was performed, during which the magnetic foreign bodies were removed and esophageal and gastric perforations were debrided and closed. The dog died following acute cardiac arrest 48 hours after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Ingestion of multiple magnetic foreign bodies carries a high risk of gastrointestinal tract perforation, volvulus, and obstruction. Immediate surgical intervention is recommended in such cases and would have likely improved the outcome for the dog of this report.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Garneau's present address is Red Bank Veterinary Hospital, 210 Rte 206 S, Hillsborough, NJ 08844.

Address correspondence to Dr. Garneau (mark.garneau@gmail.com).