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Letters to the Editor

Appropriate macronutrient balance for small animal diets

I found the article “Awareness and evaluation of natural pet food products in the United States”1 to be interesting, but I worry that statements in the article might be interpreted as arguing against feeding high-protein, low-carbohydrate foods to dogs and cats.

With regard to diets for dogs, the authors cite a study2 that found genetic evidence suggesting that dogs have a greater ability than wolves to digest starch and suggest that these findings indicate that “as domestication progressed, dogs evolved the capacity to thrive on starch-enriched diets.” However, even