• 1. Radišić B, Capak D & Matičić D, et al. Surgical treatment of a unilateral scrotal hernia in a ram—a case report. Veterinarski Arh 2010; 80: 145154.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Greber D, Doherr M & Drogemuller C, et al. Occurrence of congenital disorders in Swiss sheep. Acta Vet Scand 2013; 55: 27.

  • 3. Al-Sobayil FA, Ahmed AF. Surgical treatment for different forms of hernias in sheep and goats. J Vet Sci 2007; 8: 185191.

  • 4. Roberts SJ. Scrotal hernia in rams. Cornell Vet 1988; 78: 351352.

  • 5. Braun WF, Cole WJ. Unilateral scrotal hernia repair in a ram lamb. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1985; 187: 500.

  • 6. Orr AE. Inguinal hernia in sheep. Vet Rec 1956; 68: 24.

  • 7. St Jean G. Male reproductive surgery. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 1995; 11: 5593.

  • 8. Capak D, Radišic B & Vnuk D, et al. Unilateral scrotal hernia in ram, in Proceedings. XVI Cong Mediterr Fed Health Prod Rumin 2008;313316.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Chaudhry NI. Scrotal hernia in rams. Pak Vet J 1981; 1: 124126.

  • 10. Prasad B, Singh J, Kohli RN. Scrotal hernia in a Corriedale ram. Indian Vet J 1978; 55: 6869.

  • 11. Ramakrishna O, Rao KV. Scrotal hernia in a Corriedale ram. Indian J Anim Health 1982; 21: 135136.

  • 12. Singh J, Prasad B, Rathor SS. Oscheocele in a ram. Haryana Vet 1975; 14: 105106.

  • 13. Rossignol F, Mespoulhes-Riviere C & Vitte A, et al. Standing laparoscopic inguinal hernioplasty using cyanoacrylate for preventing recurrence of acquired strangulated inguinal herniation in 10 stallions. Vet Surg 2014; 43: 611.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Caron JP, Mehler SJ. Laparoscopic mesh incisional hernioplasty in five horses. Vet Surg 2009; 38: 318325.

  • 15. Mariën T. Standing laparoscopic herniorrhaphy in stallions using cylindrical polypropylene mesh prosthesis. Equine Vet J 2001; 33: 9196.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Caron JP, Brakenhoff J. Intracorporeal suture closure of the internal inguinal and vaginal rings in foals and horses. Vet Surg 2008; 37: 126131.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Wilderjans H, Meulyzer M, Simon O. Standing laparoscopic peritoneal flap hernioplasty technique for preventing recurrence of acquired strangulating inguinal herniation in stallions. Vet Surg 2012; 41: 292299.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Rossignol F, Perrin R, Boening KJ. Laparoscopic hernioplasty in recumbent horses using transposition of a peritoneal flap. Vet Surg 2007; 36: 557562.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19. Pott PP, Schwarz ML & Gundling R, et al. Mechanical properties of mesh materials used for hernia repair and soft tissue augmentation. PLoS One 2012;7: e46978.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20. Targarona EM, Gracia E & Rodriguez M, et al. Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Arch Surg 2003; 138: 133141.

  • 21. Witte TH, Wilke M & Stahl C, et al. Use of a hand-assisted laparoscopic surgical technique for closure of an extensive mesojejunal rent in a horse. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013; 243: 11661169.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22. Muňoz J, Bussy C. Standing hand-assisted laparoscopic treatment of left dorsal displacement of the large colon and closure of the nephrosplenic space. Vet Surg 2013; 42: 595599.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23. Goodin JT, Rodgerson DH, Gomez JH. Standing hand-assisted laparoscopic ovariectomy in 65 mares. Vet Surg 2011; 40: 9092.

  • 24. Keoughan CG, Rodgerson DH, Brown MP. Hand-assisted laparoscopic left nephrectomy in standing horses. Vet Surg 2003; 32: 206212.

  • 25. Hofmeister E, Peroni JF, Fisher AT. Effects of carbon dioxide insufflation and body position on blood gas values in horses anesthetized for laparoscopy. J Equine Vet Sci 2008; 28: 549553.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Laparoscopic inguinal hernioplasty in a ram

Alexander J. DanielDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Alexander J. Daniel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Jeremiah T. EasleyDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Jeremiah T. Easley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Timothy N. HoltDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Timothy N. Holt in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
John C. HuhnCovidien Animal Health, 555 Long Wharf Dr, New Haven, CT.

Search for other papers by John C. Huhn in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Eileen S. HackettDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Eileen S. Hackett in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-month-old Hampshire ram underwent open right inguinal herniorrhaphy and unilateral castration following herniation that developed after a kick injury. Seven months later, the ram was reevaluated because of scrotal swelling of 1 month's duration as well as suspected left inguinal hernia.

Clinical Findings—The ram had marked scrotal swelling. Palpation of the left testicle revealed no abnormalities. Ultrasonographic examination revealed heterogenous tissue within the cranial and medial portions of the scrotum with pronounced accumulation of hypoechoic fluid at the scrotal apex. Examination findings indicated left-sided indirect inguinal herniation of omentum.

Treatment and Outcome—To preserve fertility, left inguinal hernioplasty without castration was performed. The ram was anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency, and laparoscopic abdominal evaluation revealed omental entrapment within the left inguinal ring. The omentum was removed, and a polypropylene mesh was secured over the internal inguinal ring with an articulating hernia stapler. Following mesh placement, a dorsally based peritoneal flap was elevated and secured over the mesh repair. The ram recovered well from surgery; there was no repeated herniation following the surgical correction, and the ram was able to breed successfully without complication.

Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic mesh hernioplasty can be successful in rams with inguinal hernias when preservation of fertility is preferred.

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-month-old Hampshire ram underwent open right inguinal herniorrhaphy and unilateral castration following herniation that developed after a kick injury. Seven months later, the ram was reevaluated because of scrotal swelling of 1 month's duration as well as suspected left inguinal hernia.

Clinical Findings—The ram had marked scrotal swelling. Palpation of the left testicle revealed no abnormalities. Ultrasonographic examination revealed heterogenous tissue within the cranial and medial portions of the scrotum with pronounced accumulation of hypoechoic fluid at the scrotal apex. Examination findings indicated left-sided indirect inguinal herniation of omentum.

Treatment and Outcome—To preserve fertility, left inguinal hernioplasty without castration was performed. The ram was anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency, and laparoscopic abdominal evaluation revealed omental entrapment within the left inguinal ring. The omentum was removed, and a polypropylene mesh was secured over the internal inguinal ring with an articulating hernia stapler. Following mesh placement, a dorsally based peritoneal flap was elevated and secured over the mesh repair. The ram recovered well from surgery; there was no repeated herniation following the surgical correction, and the ram was able to breed successfully without complication.

Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic mesh hernioplasty can be successful in rams with inguinal hernias when preservation of fertility is preferred.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by the Colorado State University Critical Care Education and Research Fund.

Address correspondence to Dr. Hackett (Eileen.Hackett@colostate.edu).