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  • 1 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
History

Three 6-week-old pigs were submitted alive for necropsy to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The pigs were from a farm that operated a multisite production system, with a farrowing site and a wean-to-finish site. Among the 4,400 pigs at the wean-to-finish site, there was an outbreak of illness with estimated morbidity rate of 20% and estimated mortality rate of 8%. Pigs at the wean-to-finish site had been born within 2.5 weeks of each other and had been weaned at 3 weeks of age. The 3 pigs submitted (all 6 weeks old) for euthanasia and necropsy were

History

Three 6-week-old pigs were submitted alive for necropsy to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The pigs were from a farm that operated a multisite production system, with a farrowing site and a wean-to-finish site. Among the 4,400 pigs at the wean-to-finish site, there was an outbreak of illness with estimated morbidity rate of 20% and estimated mortality rate of 8%. Pigs at the wean-to-finish site had been born within 2.5 weeks of each other and had been weaned at 3 weeks of age. The 3 pigs submitted (all 6 weeks old) for euthanasia and necropsy were

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Duane Long for help in obtaining the history for this case.

Address correspondence to Dr. Ramos-Vara (ramosja@purdue.edu).