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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333.
  • | 3 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 4 Dr. Baseler is supported by the National Institutes of Health Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program.
History

An 18-year-old sexually intact male ball python (Python regius) housed at a local Indiana zoo was found moribund without prior clinical signs and was transported to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. On arrival at the diagnostic laboratory, the snake was alive, yet extremely lethargic; it was placed in a carbon dioxide–filled chamber until completely immobile and unresponsive followed by decapitation prior to necropsy.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Caretakers of the snake did not note any clinical signs prior to the sudden onset of lethargy. At necropsy, the snake was lean with atrophied fat bodies;

History

An 18-year-old sexually intact male ball python (Python regius) housed at a local Indiana zoo was found moribund without prior clinical signs and was transported to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. On arrival at the diagnostic laboratory, the snake was alive, yet extremely lethargic; it was placed in a carbon dioxide–filled chamber until completely immobile and unresponsive followed by decapitation prior to necropsy.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Caretakers of the snake did not note any clinical signs prior to the sudden onset of lethargy. At necropsy, the snake was lean with atrophied fat bodies;

Contributor Notes

Dr. Baseler's present address is National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, 903 S 4th St, Bldg 28, Hamilton, MT 59840.

Presented in abstract form at the 31st Annual Midwest Association of Veterinary Pathologists Meeting, New Harmony, Ind, July 2012.

Address correspondence to Dr. Ramos-Vara (ramosja@purdue.edu).