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Anesthesia Case of the Month

Lidia Kowalczyk DVM, DVM, Dr med vet1 and Yves P. Moens DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 Anaesthesiology and Perioperative Intensive-Care, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, 1210 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 2 Anaesthesiology and Perioperative Intensive-Care, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, 1210 Vienna, Austria.
History

A 10-year-old 45-kg (99-lb) castrated male English Pointer with body condition score of 5 of 6 was evaluated for removal of a subcutaneous mass in the left thoracic wall diagnosed as a mast cell tumor on the basis of results of examination of fine-needle aspirates. Additionally, the dog had an 8-week history of reverse sneezing, coughing, and purulent nasal discharge with episodes of dyspnea and cyanosis.

On physical examination, the patient was bright, alert, and responsive but appeared stressed and was panting heavily; therefore, thoracic auscultation and body temperature measurement were not performed. Heart rate was 120 beats/min; mucous

History

A 10-year-old 45-kg (99-lb) castrated male English Pointer with body condition score of 5 of 6 was evaluated for removal of a subcutaneous mass in the left thoracic wall diagnosed as a mast cell tumor on the basis of results of examination of fine-needle aspirates. Additionally, the dog had an 8-week history of reverse sneezing, coughing, and purulent nasal discharge with episodes of dyspnea and cyanosis.

On physical examination, the patient was bright, alert, and responsive but appeared stressed and was panting heavily; therefore, thoracic auscultation and body temperature measurement were not performed. Heart rate was 120 beats/min; mucous

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kowalczyk (lidia.kowalczyk@vetmeduni.ac.at).