• 1. Galyean ML, Perino LJ, Duff GC. Interaction of cattle health/immunity and nutrition. J Anim Sci 1999; 77: 11201134.

  • 2. Smith RA, Stokka GL, Radostits O, et al. Health and production management in beef feedlots. In: Radostits O, ed. Herd health: food animal production medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2001; 592595.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. White BJ, Renter DG. Bayesian estimation of the performance of using clinical observations and harvest lung lesions for diagnosing bovine respiratory disease in post-weaned beef calves. J Vet Diagn Invest 2009; 21: 446453.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Amrine DE, White BJ, Larson R, et al. Precision and accuracy of clinical illness scores, compared with pulmonary consolidation scores, in Holstein calves with experimentally induced Mycoplasma bovis pneumonia. Am J Vet Res 2013; 74: 310315.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Torres S, Thomson DU, Bello NM, et al. Field study of the comparative efficacy of gamithromycin and tulathromycin for the control of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease complex in beef feedlot calves at high risk of developing respiratory tract disease. Am J Vet Res 2013; 74: 839846.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Theurer ME, Anderson DE, White BJ, et al. Effects of weather variables on thermoregulation of calves during periods of extreme heat. Am J Vet Res 2014; 75: 296300.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Babcock AH, Cernicchiaro N, White BJ, et al. A multivariable assessment quantifying effects of cohort-level factors associated with combined mortality and culling risk in cohorts of U.S. commercial feedlot cattle. Prev Vet Med 2013; 108: 3846.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Amrine DE, White BJ, Larson RL. Comparison of classification algorithms to predict outcomes of feedlot cattle identified and treated for bovine respiratory disease. Comput Electron Agric 2014; 105: 919.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Dohoo IR, Martin W, Stryhn H. Veterinary epidemiologic research. Charlottetown, PE, Canada: AVC Inc, 2003; 91127.

  • 10. Edwards TA. Control methods for bovine respiratory disease for feedlot cattle. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2010; 26: 273284.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Brooks KR, Raper KC, Ward CE, et al. Economic effects of bovine respiratory disease on feedlot cattle during backgrounding and finishing phases. Prof Anim Sci 2011; 27: 195203.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Radostits O. Herd health: food animal production medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2001; 147188.

  • 13. Hanzlicek GA, White BJ, Mosier D, et al. Serial evaluation of physiologic, pathological, and behavioral changes related to disease progression of experimentally induced Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia in postweaned calves. Am J Vet Res 2010; 71: 359369.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Theurer ME, Anderson DE, White BJ, et al. Effect of Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia on behavior and physiologic responses of calves during high ambient environmental temperatures. J Anim Sci 2013; 91: 39173929.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15. Ames TR, Markham RJ, Opuda-Asibo J, et al. Pulmonary response to intratracheal challenge with Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. Can J Comp Med 1985; 49: 395400.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Hewson J, Viel L, Caswell JL, et al. Impact of isoflupredone acetate treatment on clinical signs and weight gain in weanling heifers with experimentally induced Mannheimia haemolytica bronchopneumonia. Am J Vet Res 2011; 72: 16131621.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Vestweber JG, Klemm RD, Leipold HW, et al. Clinical and pathologic studies of experimentally induced Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia in calves. Am J Vet Res 1990; 51: 17921798.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Theurer ME, White BJ, Larson RL, et al. A simulation model to determine the economic value of changing diagnostic test characteristics for identification of cattle for treatment of bovine respiratory disease, in Proceedings. Bovine Respir Dis Symp 2014;1718.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19. Irsik M, Langemeier M, Schroeder T, et al. Estimating the effects of animal health on the performance of feedlot cattle. Bovine Pract 2006; 40: 6574.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20. Schroeder TC, Albright ML, Langemeier MR, et al. Factors affecting cattle feeding profitability. J Am Soc Farm Man Rural Appras 1993; 57: 4854.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21. Reinhardt CD, Busby WD, Corah LR. Relationship of various incoming cattle traits with feedlot performance and carcass traits. J Anim Sci 2009; 87: 30303042.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22. Kelly AP, Janzen ED. A review of morbidity and mortality rates and disease occurrence in North American feedlot cattle. Can Vet J 1986; 27: 496500.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23. Bateman KG, Martin SW, Shewen PE, et al. An evaluation of antimicrobial therapy for undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease. Can Vet J 1990; 31: 689696.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24. Babcock AH, White BJ, Renter DG, et al. Predicting cumulative risk of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) using feedlot arrival data and daily morbidity and mortality counts. Can J Vet Res 2013; 77: 3344.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25. Corbin MJ, Griffin D. Assessing performance of feedlot operations using epidemiology. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2006; 22: 3551.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Relationship between rectal temperature at first treatment for bovine respiratory disease complex in feedlot calves and the probability of not finishing the production cycle

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 5 Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between rectal temperature at first treatment for bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in feedlot calves and the probability of not finishing the production cycle.

Design—Retrospective data analysis.

Animals—344,982 calves identified as having BRDC from 19 US feedlots from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—For each calf, data for rectal temperature at initial treatment for BRDC and various performance and outcome variables were analyzed. A binary variable was created to identify calves that did not finish (DNF) the production cycle (died or culled prior to cohort slaughter). A mixed general linear model and receiver operating characteristic curve were created to evaluate associations of rectal temperature, number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis, body weight, quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and all 2-way interactions with rectal temperature with the probability that calves DNF.

Results—27,495 of 344,982 (7.97%) calves DNF. Mean rectal temperature at first treatment for BRDC was 40.0°C (104°F). As rectal temperature increased, the probability that a calf DNF increased; however, that relationship was not linear and was influenced by quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for correct identification of a calf that DNF was 0.646.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Rectal temperature of feedlot calves at first treatment for BRDC had limited value as a prognostic indicator of whether those calves would finish the production cycle.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between rectal temperature at first treatment for bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in feedlot calves and the probability of not finishing the production cycle.

Design—Retrospective data analysis.

Animals—344,982 calves identified as having BRDC from 19 US feedlots from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—For each calf, data for rectal temperature at initial treatment for BRDC and various performance and outcome variables were analyzed. A binary variable was created to identify calves that did not finish (DNF) the production cycle (died or culled prior to cohort slaughter). A mixed general linear model and receiver operating characteristic curve were created to evaluate associations of rectal temperature, number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis, body weight, quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and all 2-way interactions with rectal temperature with the probability that calves DNF.

Results—27,495 of 344,982 (7.97%) calves DNF. Mean rectal temperature at first treatment for BRDC was 40.0°C (104°F). As rectal temperature increased, the probability that a calf DNF increased; however, that relationship was not linear and was influenced by quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for correct identification of a calf that DNF was 0.646.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Rectal temperature of feedlot calves at first treatment for BRDC had limited value as a prognostic indicator of whether those calves would finish the production cycle.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Amrine's present address is Professional Beef Services LLC, 1048 Highland Ridge Dr, Manhattan, KS 66503.

The study was conducted at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

There was no extra-institutional funding or support for this project.

Presented as an oral presentation at the American Association of Bovine Practitioners Conference, Albuquerque, September 2014.

Address correspondence to Dr. White (bwhite@vet.k-state.edu).