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Are there legitimate reasons to retain lead ammunition and fishing gear?

Robert H. Poppenga DVM, PhD1, Pat T. Redig DVM, PhD2, and James G. Sikarskie DVM, MS3
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  • 1 California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Veterinary Clinical Sciences Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 3 Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Contributor Notes

The authors have no sources of funding, financial conflicts of interest, or disclaimers to declare.

Address correspondence to Dr. Poppenga (rhpoppenga@ucdavis.edu).