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Performance of two portable meters and a benchtop analyzer for blood glucose concentration measurement in rabbits

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  • 1 Clinica per Animali Esotici, Centro Veterinario Specialistico, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Roma, Italy.
  • | 2 Clinica per Animali Esotici, Centro Veterinario Specialistico, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Roma, Italy.
  • | 3 Ematos Vet Lab, Via Rapagnano, 89, 00138 Roma, Italy.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate performance of a human portable blood glucose meter (PBGM), a veterinary PBGM, and a veterinary benchtop analyzer for measuring blood glucose concentration in rabbits and to evaluate the effect of sample characteristics on their performance.

Design—Observational prospective cross-sectional study.

Sample—Blood samples from 89 pet rabbits.

Procedures—Blood glucose concentration was measured with a human PBGM (n = 89 rabbits), a veterinary PBGM (89), and a benchtop analyzer (32) and compared with results obtained with plasma in a laboratory analyzer (hexokinase method).

Results—The human PBGM underestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at high Hcts, and had the lowest total error observed (11.4%). The veterinary PBGM overestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at low Hcts and at high blood glucose concentrations, and had the highest total error (15.5% and 29.8% for canine and feline settings, respectively). The benchtop analyzer had good accuracy and was not influenced by Hct or glucose concentrations. Clinical errors would have occurred in 0% of cases with the human PBGM and with the benchtop analyzer and in 9% (canine setting) to 6.7% (feline setting) of cases with the veterinary PBGM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that use of the human PBGM evaluated in this study would be acceptable for point-of-care testing of blood glucose concentration in rabbits when benchtop analyzers are not available. The use of the veterinary PBGM evaluated in this study may alter both treatment and diagnostic decisions because of the overestimation of glucose concentrations in some rabbits.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate performance of a human portable blood glucose meter (PBGM), a veterinary PBGM, and a veterinary benchtop analyzer for measuring blood glucose concentration in rabbits and to evaluate the effect of sample characteristics on their performance.

Design—Observational prospective cross-sectional study.

Sample—Blood samples from 89 pet rabbits.

Procedures—Blood glucose concentration was measured with a human PBGM (n = 89 rabbits), a veterinary PBGM (89), and a benchtop analyzer (32) and compared with results obtained with plasma in a laboratory analyzer (hexokinase method).

Results—The human PBGM underestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at high Hcts, and had the lowest total error observed (11.4%). The veterinary PBGM overestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at low Hcts and at high blood glucose concentrations, and had the highest total error (15.5% and 29.8% for canine and feline settings, respectively). The benchtop analyzer had good accuracy and was not influenced by Hct or glucose concentrations. Clinical errors would have occurred in 0% of cases with the human PBGM and with the benchtop analyzer and in 9% (canine setting) to 6.7% (feline setting) of cases with the veterinary PBGM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that use of the human PBGM evaluated in this study would be acceptable for point-of-care testing of blood glucose concentration in rabbits when benchtop analyzers are not available. The use of the veterinary PBGM evaluated in this study may alter both treatment and diagnostic decisions because of the overestimation of glucose concentrations in some rabbits.

Contributor Notes

Presented in abstract form at the 12th Annual Conference of the Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians, Indianapolis, September 2013.

The authors thank Dr. Tommaso Collarile, Dr. Alessandra Carnimeo, Dr. Ivano A. Ciraci, and Dr. Francesca Caldarelli for assistance with clinical procedures.

Address correspondence to Dr. Di Girolamo (nicoladiggi@gmail.com).