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  • 1 Section of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520
  • | 2 Section of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520
  • | 3 Section of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520

Contributor Notes

Dr. Beck's present address is Scripps Florida, 130 Scripps Way, Jupiter, FL 33458.

Address correspondence to Dr. Beck (abeck@scripps.edu).