• 1. Morley PS. Biosecurity of veterinary practices. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2002; 18: 133155.

  • 2. Ewart SL, Schott HC, Robinson RL, et al. Identification of sources of Salmonella organisms in a veterinary teaching hospital and evaluation of the effects of disinfectants on detection of Salmonella organisms on surface materials. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001; 218: 11451151.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Ward MP, Brady TH, Couetil LL, et al. Investigation and control an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium in a population of hospitalized horses. Vet Microbiol 2005; 107: 233240.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. House JK, Mainar-Jaime RC, Smith BP, et al. Risk factors for nosocomial Salmonella infection among hospitalized horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999; 214: 15111516.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Ekiri AB, MacKay RJ, Gaskin JM, et al. Epidemiologic analysis of nosocomial Salmonella infections in hospitalized horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009; 234: 108119.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Dallap Schaer BL, Aceto H & Rankin SC. Outbreak of salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Newport MDR-AmpC in a large animal veterinary teaching hospital. J Vet Intern Med 2010; 24: 11381146.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Ekiri AB, Morton AJ, Long MT, et al. Review of the epidemiology and infection control aspects of nosocomial Salmonella infections in hospitalized horses. Equine Vet Educ 2010; 22: 631641.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Morley PS. Surveillance for nosocomial infections in veterinary hospitals. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 2004; 20: 561576.

  • 9. Smith BP. Evolution of equine infection control programs. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 2004; 20: 521530.

  • 10. Smith BP, House JK, Magdesian KG, et al. Principles of an infectious disease control program for preventing nosocomial gastrointestinal and respiratory tract diseases in large animal veterinary hospitals. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004; 225: 11861195.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Traub-Dargatz JL, Dargatz DA, Morley PS, et al. An overview of infection control strategies for equine facilities, with an emphasis on veterinary hospitals. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 2004; 20: 507520.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Steneroden KK, Van Metre DC, Jackson C, et al. Detection and control of a nosocomial outbreak caused by Salmonella Newport at a large animal hospital. J Vet Intern Med 2010; 24: 606616.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13. United States Census Bureau. Florida counties map. Available at: www2.census.gov/geo/maps/general_ref/stco_outline/cen2k_pgsz/stco_FL.pdf. Accessed Dec 16, 2013.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Hartnack AK, Van Metre DC & Morley PS. Salmonella enterica shedding in hospitalized horses and associations with diarrhea occurrence among their stablemates and gastrointestinal-related illness or death following discharge. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2012; 240: 726733.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Awareness, perceived relevance, and acceptance of large animal hospital surveillance and infection control practices by referring veterinarians and clients

Abel B. EkiriDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Abel B. Ekiri in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVM, PhD
,
Amanda M. HouseDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Amanda M. House in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Traci M. KruegerDepartment of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Traci M. Krueger in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPH
, and
Jorge A. HernandezDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Jorge A. Hernandez in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To assess awareness, perceived relevance, and acceptance of surveillance and infection control practices at a large animal referral hospital among referring veterinarians and clients who sent horses to the facility for veterinary care.

Design—Survey.

Sample—57 referring veterinarians and 594 clients.

Procedures—A 15-question survey targeting Salmonella enterica as an important pathogen of interest in horses was sent to clients who sent ≥ 1 horse to the University of Florida Large Animal Hospital for veterinary care during July 1, 2007, through July 1, 2011, and to veterinarians who had referred horses to the same hospital prior to July 1, 2011. Responses were summarized with descriptive statistics. The χ2 test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to examine associations among variables of interest.

Results—Survey response rates were low (57/467 [12%] for veterinarians and 594/3,095 [19%] for clients). Significantly more (35/56 [63%]) veterinarians than clients (227/585 [39%]) were aware that the hospital operates a surveillance and infection control program. Most veterinarians (56/57 [98%]) and clients (554/574 [97%]) indicated that sampling and testing of horses to detect Salmonella shedding in feces at admission and during hospitalization was justified. In addition, on a scale of 1 (not important) to 10 (very important), veterinarians and clients indicated it was very important (median score, 10 [interquartile range, 8 to 10] for both groups) that a referral hospital operates a surveillance and infection control program.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Survey results indicated that awareness of hospital surveillance and infection control practices was higher among veterinarians than clients, and these practices were considered relevant and well-accepted among participant veterinarians and clients.

Abstract

Objective—To assess awareness, perceived relevance, and acceptance of surveillance and infection control practices at a large animal referral hospital among referring veterinarians and clients who sent horses to the facility for veterinary care.

Design—Survey.

Sample—57 referring veterinarians and 594 clients.

Procedures—A 15-question survey targeting Salmonella enterica as an important pathogen of interest in horses was sent to clients who sent ≥ 1 horse to the University of Florida Large Animal Hospital for veterinary care during July 1, 2007, through July 1, 2011, and to veterinarians who had referred horses to the same hospital prior to July 1, 2011. Responses were summarized with descriptive statistics. The χ2 test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to examine associations among variables of interest.

Results—Survey response rates were low (57/467 [12%] for veterinarians and 594/3,095 [19%] for clients). Significantly more (35/56 [63%]) veterinarians than clients (227/585 [39%]) were aware that the hospital operates a surveillance and infection control program. Most veterinarians (56/57 [98%]) and clients (554/574 [97%]) indicated that sampling and testing of horses to detect Salmonella shedding in feces at admission and during hospitalization was justified. In addition, on a scale of 1 (not important) to 10 (very important), veterinarians and clients indicated it was very important (median score, 10 [interquartile range, 8 to 10] for both groups) that a referral hospital operates a surveillance and infection control program.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Survey results indicated that awareness of hospital surveillance and infection control practices was higher among veterinarians than clients, and these practices were considered relevant and well-accepted among participant veterinarians and clients.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Loretta Rodriguez and Stephanie Kirchman for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Hernandez (hernandezja@ufl.edu).