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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
History

A 7-week-old 9.6-kg (21.1-lb) female Yorkshire pig was submitted for euthanasia and necropsy to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The pig was from a group of 30 Yorkshire pigs that had been weaned 4 weeks prior but had never thrived, with some pigs having developed diarrhea and coughing. In the 2 days prior to submission of the pig, 5 other pigs in the group developed clinical signs including shivering, lethargy, dyspnea, and staggering that progressed to paddling and death within 12 to 14 hours. Some of the affected pigs had swollen eyelids. The antemortem clinical signs

History

A 7-week-old 9.6-kg (21.1-lb) female Yorkshire pig was submitted for euthanasia and necropsy to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The pig was from a group of 30 Yorkshire pigs that had been weaned 4 weeks prior but had never thrived, with some pigs having developed diarrhea and coughing. In the 2 days prior to submission of the pig, 5 other pigs in the group developed clinical signs including shivering, lethargy, dyspnea, and staggering that progressed to paddling and death within 12 to 14 hours. Some of the affected pigs had swollen eyelids. The antemortem clinical signs

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Ramos-Vara (ramosja@purdue.edu).