• 1. Marioni-Henry K, Vite CH, Newton AL, et al. Prevalence of diseases of the spinal cord of cats. J Vet Intern Med 2004; 18: 851858.

  • 2. Goncalves R, Platt SR, Llabres-Diaz FJ, et al. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 92 cats with clinical signs of spinal cord disease. J Feline Med Surg 2009; 11: 5359.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Spodnick GJ, Berg J, Moore FM, et al. Spinal lymphoma in cats: 21 cases (1976–1989). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992; 200: 373376.

  • 4. Lane SB, Kornegay JN, Duncan JR, et al. Feline spinal lymphosarcoma: a retrospective evaluation of 23 cats. J Vet Intern Med 1994; 8: 99104.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Marioni-Henry K, Van Winkle TJ, Smith SH, et al. Tumors affecting the spinal cord of cats: 85 cases (1980–2005). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008; 232: 237243.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Stigen O, Ytrehus B & Eggertsdottir AV. Spinal cord astrocytoma in a cat. J Small Anim Pract 2001; 42: 306310.

  • 7. Haynes JS & Leininger JR. A glioma in the spinal cord of a cat. Vet Pathol 1892; 19: 713715.

  • 8. Parent JM, Isler C, Holmberg DL, et al. Intramedullary spinal glioblastoma in a cat, presented as a cauda equine syndrome. Can Vet J 1982; 23: 169172.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

What Is Your Neurologic Diagnosis?

Rodrigo Gutierrez-Quintana MVZ, MVM1, Jacques Penderis BVSc, MVM, PhD2, and Thomas J. Anderson BVM&S, MVM, PhD3
View More View Less
  • 1 School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Bearsden Road, Glasgow, G61 1QH, Scotland.
  • | 2 School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Bearsden Road, Glasgow, G61 1QH, Scotland.
  • | 3 School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Bearsden Road, Glasgow, G61 1QH, Scotland.

A 10-year-old 4-kg (8.8-lb) neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of a 3-month history of slowly progressive left thoracic limb lameness and weakness, followed by the additional onset of bilateral pelvic limb ataxia the week prior to evaluation. Radiography of the left thoracic limb performed previously had not revealed any major orthopedic abnormalities. Oral administration of meloxicama during the month prior to evaluation did not result in any notable improvement. General physical examination findings were unremarkable; a neurologic examination was also performed.

Neurologic examinationObservation

What is the problem? Where is the lesion? What are the

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Drs. Hal Thompson and Catherine Lamm for performing the necropsy and histological examination.

Address correspondence to Mr. Gutierrez-Quintana (Rodrigo.GutierrezQuintana@glasgow.ac.uk).