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Use of hydropulsion for the treatment of superficial corneal foreign bodies: 15 cases (1999–2013)

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Abstract

Objective—To describe the use of hydropulsion with sterile isotonic buffered ophthalmic solution (ie, eyewash) for the treatment of superficial corneal foreign bodies in veterinary patients and evaluate signalment, clinical findings, and outcomes following the procedure.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—11 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 horses.

Procedures—Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients that underwent hydropulsion treatment for a superficial, nonpenetrating corneal foreign body confirmed by ophthalmic examination. Data regarding signalment, reason for evaluation, ocular diagnoses, and treatment were recorded. Hydropulsion was performed with a 6-mL syringe filled with eyewash solution and a 25-gauge needle with the needle tip removed. Owners and referring veterinarians of patients that did not have a recheck examination recorded were contacted by telephone for follow-up information.

Results—The corneal foreign body was an incidental finding in 3 of 15 patients. The most common clinical signs included blepharospasm, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal vascularization. Hydropulsion was successful for foreign body removal in all 15 cases. No complications were observed during or following the procedure. In the 9 patients that had a follow-up examination, the cornea tested negative for retention of topically applied fluorescein (with a mean of 6.3 days from treatment to follow-up). At the time of last follow-up examination or telephone follow-up, no patients were reported to have clinical signs of ocular discomfort or corneal opacity associated with the affected site.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In these patients, hydropulsion was easily performed with readily available materials and was successful for the removal of superficial corneal foreign bodies with no adverse effects.

Abstract

Objective—To describe the use of hydropulsion with sterile isotonic buffered ophthalmic solution (ie, eyewash) for the treatment of superficial corneal foreign bodies in veterinary patients and evaluate signalment, clinical findings, and outcomes following the procedure.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—11 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 horses.

Procedures—Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients that underwent hydropulsion treatment for a superficial, nonpenetrating corneal foreign body confirmed by ophthalmic examination. Data regarding signalment, reason for evaluation, ocular diagnoses, and treatment were recorded. Hydropulsion was performed with a 6-mL syringe filled with eyewash solution and a 25-gauge needle with the needle tip removed. Owners and referring veterinarians of patients that did not have a recheck examination recorded were contacted by telephone for follow-up information.

Results—The corneal foreign body was an incidental finding in 3 of 15 patients. The most common clinical signs included blepharospasm, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal vascularization. Hydropulsion was successful for foreign body removal in all 15 cases. No complications were observed during or following the procedure. In the 9 patients that had a follow-up examination, the cornea tested negative for retention of topically applied fluorescein (with a mean of 6.3 days from treatment to follow-up). At the time of last follow-up examination or telephone follow-up, no patients were reported to have clinical signs of ocular discomfort or corneal opacity associated with the affected site.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In these patients, hydropulsion was easily performed with readily available materials and was successful for the removal of superficial corneal foreign bodies with no adverse effects.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Shari Poruba and Lorri Zoch for technical assistance and Abby Schrader, Dr. Kimberly Galloway, and Dr. Karie Vander Werf for contributing case material.

Address correspondence to Dr. Labelle (alabelle@illinois.edu).