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Second intention healing after wide local excision of soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs in dogs: 31 cases (2005–2012)

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  • 1 Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.
  • | 2 Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.
  • | 3 Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.
  • | 4 Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.
  • | 5 Australian Specialised Animal Pathology, 53 Glenvale Crescent, Mulgrave, VIC 3170, Australia.
  • | 6 Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcomes for dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing after wide excision (2-cm lateral surgical margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep) of the tumors.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing following wide local excision of their tumors.

Procedures—Tumors were excised with 2-cm lateral margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep to tumors. Wounds healed by means of second intention. Time to healing, complications during healing, and information regarding tumor recurrence were recorded.

Results—All tumors were excised with histologically tumor-free margins. Twenty-nine (93.5%) wounds healed completely by second intention (median time, 53 days). Two (6.5%) dogs required free skin graft procedures to facilitate healing. Complications during open wound management developed for 7 (22.6%) dogs. Long-term complications were detected for 8 (25.8%) dogs, including intermittent epidermal disruption (5/31 [16.1%]) and wound contracture (3/31 [9.7%]). All complications were managed conservatively. Local tumor recurrence was detected for 1 (3.2%) dog. Median follow-up time was 980 days (range, 380 to 2,356 days). No patients died because of tumor-related causes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated second intention healing of large wounds in the distal aspects of the limbs was complete and typically without complications for dogs that underwent wide excision of soft tissue sarcomas. Wide local excision of soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs with 2-cm lateral margins and margins 1 fascial plane deep to the tumors provided excellent long-term local tumor control.

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcomes for dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing after wide excision (2-cm lateral surgical margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep) of the tumors.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing following wide local excision of their tumors.

Procedures—Tumors were excised with 2-cm lateral margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep to tumors. Wounds healed by means of second intention. Time to healing, complications during healing, and information regarding tumor recurrence were recorded.

Results—All tumors were excised with histologically tumor-free margins. Twenty-nine (93.5%) wounds healed completely by second intention (median time, 53 days). Two (6.5%) dogs required free skin graft procedures to facilitate healing. Complications during open wound management developed for 7 (22.6%) dogs. Long-term complications were detected for 8 (25.8%) dogs, including intermittent epidermal disruption (5/31 [16.1%]) and wound contracture (3/31 [9.7%]). All complications were managed conservatively. Local tumor recurrence was detected for 1 (3.2%) dog. Median follow-up time was 980 days (range, 380 to 2,356 days). No patients died because of tumor-related causes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated second intention healing of large wounds in the distal aspects of the limbs was complete and typically without complications for dogs that underwent wide excision of soft tissue sarcomas. Wide local excision of soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs with 2-cm lateral margins and margins 1 fascial plane deep to the tumors provided excellent long-term local tumor control.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. John Santamaria for assistance with statistical analyses.

Address correspondence to Dr. Prpich (cassieprpich@gmail.com).