• 1. Hardy WD. Hematopoietic tumors of cats. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1981; 17: 921940.

  • 2. Day MJ. Immunophenotypic characterization of cutaneous lymphoid neoplasia in the dog and cat. J Comp Pathol 1995; 112: 7996.

  • 3. Tobey JC, Houston DM, Breur GJ, et al. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1994; 204: 606609.

  • 4. Dallman MJ, Noxon JO, Stogsdill P. Feline lymphosarcoma with cutaneous and muscle lesions. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1982; 181: 166168.

  • 5. Caciolo PL, Hayes AA, Patnaik AK, et al. A case of mycosis fungoides in a cat and literature review. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1983; 19: 505512.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Caciolo PL, Nesbitt GH, Patnaik AK, et al. Cutaneous lymphosarcoma in the cat: a report of nine cases. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1984; 20: 491496.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Fontaine J, Heimann M, Day MJ. Cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma in the cat: a review of the literature and five new cases. Vet Dermatol 2011; 22: 454461.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Dust A, Norris AM, Valli VE. Cutaneous lymphosarcoma with IgG monoclonal gammopathy, serum hyperviscosity and hypercalcemia in a cat. Can Vet J 1982; 23: 235239.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Baker JL, Scott DW. Mycosis fungoides in two cats. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1989; 25: 97101.

  • 10. Schick RO, Murphy GF, Goldschmidt MH. Cutaneous lymphosarcoma and leukemia in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1993; 203: 11551158.

  • 11. Komori S, Nakamura S, Takahashi K, et al. Use of lomustine to treat cutaneous nonepitheliotropic lymphoma in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 226: 237239.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Wood C, Almes K, Bagladi-Swanson M, et al. Sezary syndrome in a cat. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2008; 44: 144148.

  • 13. Moore PF, Olivry T. Cutaneous lymphoma in companion animals. Clin Dermatol 1994; 12: 499505.

  • 14. Neta M, Naigamwalla D, Bienzle D. Perforin expression in feline epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma. J Vet Diagn Invest 2008; 20: 831835.

  • 15. Legendre AM, Becker PU. Feline skin lymphoma: characterization of tumor and identification of tumor-stimulating serum factor(s). Am J Vet Res 1979; 40: 18051807.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Gabor LJ, Canfield PJ, Malik R. Immunophenotypic and histologic characterization of 109 cases of feline lymphosarcoma. Vet J 1999; 77: 436441.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Fritz D, Freeman KP, Hopfner C, et al. Multilobulated “flower” cells in a subcutaneous mass aspirate from a cat. Vet Clin Pathol 2005; 34: 429433.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Lenard ZM, Zuber RM, Nicoll RG, et al. Evaluation of lymphoma in a cat using 99mTc-sestamibi. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2005; 46: 533535.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19. Kagawa Y, Yamashita T, Maetani S, et al. Cutaneous lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with systemic metastasis in a cat. J Vet Med Sci 2011; 73: 12211224.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20. Gilbert S, Affolter VK, Gross TL, et al. Clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical characterization of cutaneous lymphocytosis in 23 cats. Vet Dermatol 2004; 15: 312.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21. Kiupel M, Smedley RC, Pfent C, et al. Diagnostic algorithm to differentiate lymphoma from inflammation in feline small intestinal biopsy samples. Vet Pathol 2011; 48: 212222.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22. Elmslie RE, Ogilvie GK, Gillette EL, et al. Radiotherapy with and without chemotherapy for localized lymphoma in 10 cats. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 1991; 32: 227280.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23. Kristal O, Lana SE, Ogilvie GK, et al. Single agent chemotherapy with doxorubicin for feline lymphoma: a retrospective study of 19 cases (1994–1997). J Vet Intern Med 2001; 15: 125130.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24. Simon D, Eberle N, Laacke-Singer L, et al. Combination chemotherapy in feline lymphoma: treatment outcome, tolerability, and duration in 23 cats. J Vet Intern Med 2008; 22: 394400.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25. Willemze R, Kerl H, Sterry W, et al. EORTC classification for primary cutaneous lymphomas: a proposal from the Cutaneous Lymphoma Study Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Blood 1997; 90: 354371.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26. Willemze R. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: classification and treatment. Curr Opin Oncol 2006; 18: 425431.

  • 27. Van Pelt RW. Pathologic changes of joint disease associated with malignant lymphoma, in cattle: clinical, gross pathologic, and histopathologic observations. Am J Vet Res 1967; 28: 429442.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28. Gerard MP, Healy LN, Bowman KF, et al. Cutaneous lymphoma with extensive periarticular involvement in a horse. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 213: 391393.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29. Held JP, McCracken MD, Toal R, et al. Epididymal swelling attributable to generalized lymphosarcoma in a stallion. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992; 201: 19131915.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30. Pearson GR, Day MJ, Main D, et al. B-cell (CD79a+) lymphoma affecting the tarsal joint synovia in a sheep. J Comp Pathol 1999; 120: 295299.

  • 31. Vail DM, Moore AS, Ogilvie GK, et al. Feline lymphoma (145 cases): proliferation indices, cluster of differentiation 3 immunoreactivity, and their association with prognosis in 90 cats. J Vet Intern Med 1998; 12: 349354.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32. Patterson-Kane JC, Kugler BP, Francis K. The possible prognostic significance of immunophenotype in feline alimentary lymphoma: a pilot study. J Comp Pathol 2004; 130: 220222.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33. Moore PF, Rodriquez-Bertos A, Kass PH. Feline gastrointestinal lymphoma: mucosal architecture, immunophenotype, and molecular clonality. Vet Pathol 2012; 49: 658668.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34. Peaston AE, Maddison JE. Efficacy of doxorubicin as an induction agent for cats with lymphosarcoma. Aust Vet J 1999; 77: 442444.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 35. Vail DM, Young KM. Hematopoietic tumors. In: Withrow SJ, Vail DM, eds. Withrow and MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology. St Louis: Saunders Elsevier, 2007; 699784.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus in cats: 23 cases (2000–2012)

Holly D. BurrDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Search for other papers by Holly D. Burr in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
John H. KeatingDepartment of Biomedical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Search for other papers by John H. Keating in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Craig A. CliffordRed Bank Veterinary Hospital, 197 Hance Ave, Tinton Falls, NJ 07724.

Search for other papers by Craig A. Clifford in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Kristine E. BurgessDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Search for other papers by Kristine E. Burgess in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS

Abstract

Objective—To determine features of lymphoma of the tarsus in cats.

Design—Multi-institutional retrospective study.

Animals—23 cats with cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus.

Procedures—Veterinary oncologists were requested to submit cases fitting the following criteria: histologically or cytologically confirmed lymphoma with a location at or near the tarsus and described as subcutaneous or mass-like. Data regarding breed, sex, age, FeLV and FIV status, and reason for evaluation were collected. Results of staging tests, location of the tumor, immunophenotype, and histopathologic description were recorded. Type of treatments, outcome, survival time, presence or absence of progressive disease, and cause of death or reason for euthanasia were also recorded.

Results—Most cats were older, with a median age of 12 years (range, 7 to 18 years). No association with positive retroviral status was found. Popliteal lymph node involvement at diagnosis was reported in 5 cats, and a suspicion of lymphoma at a different site on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography was reported in 4 cats. Treatments were variable and included corticosteroids alone (n = 2), chemotherapy (9), radiation and chemotherapy (7), or surgery with or without chemotherapy (5). Thirteen cats were reported to have lymphoma at a different site at the time of last follow-up, death, or euthanasia. Median survival time for all cats in the study was 190 days (range, 17 to 1,011 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that tarsal lymphoma is an uncommon manifestation of lymphoma in cats, and in this study was most commonly nonepitheliotropic and of high grade as determined on histologic evaluation. Systemic involvement was identified; therefore, thorough staging is recommended prior to initiating treatment. Future studies are warranted to evaluate effective treatment protocols.

Abstract

Objective—To determine features of lymphoma of the tarsus in cats.

Design—Multi-institutional retrospective study.

Animals—23 cats with cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus.

Procedures—Veterinary oncologists were requested to submit cases fitting the following criteria: histologically or cytologically confirmed lymphoma with a location at or near the tarsus and described as subcutaneous or mass-like. Data regarding breed, sex, age, FeLV and FIV status, and reason for evaluation were collected. Results of staging tests, location of the tumor, immunophenotype, and histopathologic description were recorded. Type of treatments, outcome, survival time, presence or absence of progressive disease, and cause of death or reason for euthanasia were also recorded.

Results—Most cats were older, with a median age of 12 years (range, 7 to 18 years). No association with positive retroviral status was found. Popliteal lymph node involvement at diagnosis was reported in 5 cats, and a suspicion of lymphoma at a different site on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography was reported in 4 cats. Treatments were variable and included corticosteroids alone (n = 2), chemotherapy (9), radiation and chemotherapy (7), or surgery with or without chemotherapy (5). Thirteen cats were reported to have lymphoma at a different site at the time of last follow-up, death, or euthanasia. Median survival time for all cats in the study was 190 days (range, 17 to 1,011 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that tarsal lymphoma is an uncommon manifestation of lymphoma in cats, and in this study was most commonly nonepitheliotropic and of high grade as determined on histologic evaluation. Systemic involvement was identified; therefore, thorough staging is recommended prior to initiating treatment. Future studies are warranted to evaluate effective treatment protocols.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Burr's present address is Las Vegas Veterinary Specialty Center, 8650 W Tropicana Ave, Ste B-107, Las Vegas, NV 89147. Dr. Keating's present address is CBSET Inc, 500 Patriot Way, Lexington, MA 02421. Dr. Clifford's present address is Hope Veterinary Specialists, 40 Three Tun Rd, Malvern, PA 19355.

Presented in abstract form at the 28th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Cancer Society, Seattle, October 2008.

The authors thank Drs. Michele Cohen, Sue Downing, Melanie Ellis, Susan N. Ettinger, Sarah Gillings, Sarah Kraiza, Cheryl London, Louis-Philippe de Lorimier, Claudia McFadden, C. Andrew Novosad, Brenda Phillips, Timothy Rocha, Rebecca Seaman, Bridget Urie, Kristen Weishaar, Jennifer Wiley, and Courtney Zwahlen for contributing cases.

Address correspondence to Dr. Burgess (Kristine.burgess@tufts.edu).